Investigation 3: Weather Maps


To learn more about weather maps, visit the following web sites:

Present Weather Symbols, National Weather Service
This site provides an explanation on weather symbols used for forecasting.


To learn more about atmospheric pressure, visit the following web sites:

Atmospheric Pressure: The force exerted by the weight of air, NASA
Review some general facts about air pressure, how it changes, and what happens if it changes. The page includes a list of suggested additional activities as well as a web site demonstration of air pressure changes on a hot air balloon.

It's a Breeze: How Atmospheric Pressure Effects the Weather, NASA
Find out about how a mercurial barometer measures atmospheric pressure.


To learn more about high-pressure areas and low-pressure areas, visit the following web sites:

Atmospheric Pressure, Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Introduces pressure, associated characteristics, and high and low pressure centers.


To learn more air-masses and Fronts, visit the following web sites:

Air Masses and Fronts, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin
This page about weather and why there is weather. In addition, it explains some of the symbols often seen on weather maps.

Air Masses and Fronts, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Public Affairs Office
Read about cold or warm air mass source regions and consider how your weather may vary depending on the air mass source that affects your area.

Air Masses and Fronts, Online Meteorology Guide, University of Illinois
Topics discussed on this site include:



To complete Part A, steps 1-3 of this investigation, you will need weather maps, visit the following web sites:

How to find maps


To complete Part B, steps 3-7 of this investigation, you will need weather maps highlighting specific weather variables, visit the following web sites:

How to find maps

IES Climate and Weather cover art
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