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Carleton College/NAGT materials
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Find animations showing seismograph operation, tsunami, P and S Waves, earthquake focus versus epicenter, and actual footage of an earthquake.

Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

From the PBS series, `Savage Earth,` find a variety of Flash animations dealing with earthquakes, volcanism, and tsunamis.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

This YouTube video explains the basics of tsunamis and how to protect yourself. 

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Tsunamis can neither be prevented nor precicely predicted. But people educated about particular warning signs can save their own lives and the lives of others. Through this interactive web site, you will: learn about tsunamis, gather tips to prepare for and survive a tsunami, understand tsunami-...

National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Visualizations that cover the following topics: earthquakes, the 2011 Japan earthquake and Tsunami, Sear wave propagation, the 2010 Chile earthquake, isostasy and gravity, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and plate tectonic movements.

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Oblique view of a highly generalized animation of a subduction zone where an oceanic plate is subducting beneath a continental plate. This scenario can happen repeatedly on a 100-500 year cycle. The process which produces a mega-thrust earthquake would generate a tsunami, not depicted here.

Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Watch a tsunami hit the shores of Japan and see how it affects the shoreline as the water destroys everything in its path.

TED-Ed
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

The immense swell of a tsunami can grow up to 100 feet, hitting speeds over 500 mph -- a treacherous combination for anyone or anything in its path. Alex Gendler details the causes of these towering terrors and explains how scientists are seeking to reduce their destruction in the future.

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Subduction-zone megathrust earthquakes, the most powerful earthquakes in the world, can produce tsunamis through a variety of structures that are missed by simple models. These include fault boundary rupture, deformation of overlying plate, splay faults and landslides. In this animation we...

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

Oblique view of a highly generalized animation of a subduction zone where an oceanic plate is subducting beneath a continental plate. This scenario can happen repeatedly on a 100-500 year cycle. The process which produces a mega-thrust earthquake would generate a tsunami (not depicted here).

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

This simplified animation illustrates both the subduction-zone processes that lead to a "ghost forest" as well as the evidence that scientists collected to determine that the Pacific Northwest has had many great earthquakes and tsunamis in the past, and will again inthe future. This is based on...

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

This animation shows that GPS can record the movement of the leading edge of the overlying continental plate in a subduction zone. The plates are locked and the overlying plate is forced back. When friction is overcome and strain is released, the GPS receiver will snap back toward its original...

Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)
Resource Type: Videos or Animations

This animation shows that GPS can record the movement of the leading edge of the overlying continental plate in a subduction zone. The plates are locked and the overlying plate is forced back. When friction is overcome and strain is released, the GPS receiver will snap back toward its original...

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Dimetrodon skeleton
Videos or Animations
PBS Eons

Join hosts Hank Green, Kallie Moore, and Blake de Pastino as they take you on a journey through the history of life on Earth. from the dawn of life in the Archaean Eon through the Mesozoic Era -- the so-called "Age of Dinosaurs" -- right up to the end of the most recent Ice Age.

Tornado in Dimmitt Texas 1995
Videos or Animations
National Geographic

Tornadoes, nearly three-quarters of which occur within the US, are unpredictable and can cause massive damage. New tools and data are helping scientists learn more about when they might form and what paths they might take.

Artist conception of a Mars Exploration Rover
Videos or Animations
National Geographic

Mars, the fourth planet from the sun, has been a source of intrigue throughout human history. Recent NASA exploratory expeditions revealed some of the planet's biggest mysteries. This video explains what makes Mars so different fro mEarth and what would happen if humans lived there.

North American crustal plates and earthquake epicenters
Videos or Animations
National Geographic

Plate tectonics have shufled the earth's landmasses around -- and continue to do so. What is continental drift? Anyone who's ever experienced an earthquake or seen a volcano knows that th ephrase "solid ground" doens't always apply. Over Earth's long history, the great landmasses have...

Coral fish and diver
Videos or Animations
National Geographic

Oceans serve as the planet's largest habitat and also help to regulate the global climate. But why is the ocean salty? And how is climate impacting the ocean? Find out more about the ocean, including the consequences of and potential solutions to these changes.

About the Education Resources Network

The Education Resources Network aggregates geoscience education resources from a variety of providers. The goal is to provide visitors with the widest possible collection of curricula, classroom activities, teacher professional development opportunities, science education standards, virtual field trips, teaching ancillaries and much more.

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