Geological Surveys Database

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1918, Arizona Geological Survey
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
A sudden mine disaster, by which scores and even hundreds of lives are lost, receives nation-wide attention; but deaths caused by typhoid fever, diphtheria, tuberculosis, etc., caused by unsanitary dwellings, foul air, infected water, and the like, may carry off their toll, with few voices raised...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
Perhaps you have no choice. Your age, your family, your health may hold you in the ranks of the great industrial army. But although you cannot be with the boys at the front you need not be a "slacker." You can "do your bit" in the: shop with hammer and saw, with caliper and...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
Th is is the fourth bulletin of the following series: (1) Oil and Its Geology. (2) Prospecting for Oil. (3) Drilling for Oil. (4) Laws Pertaining to Oil. It is not intended in this bulletin to give a complete and exhaustive study of the law relating to oil and gas land nor consider all the...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
What is my duty, what is the most sensible and profitable course for me to follow in my private and business affairs during the continuance of the war? This is the great question confronting every American citizen. Here is a common-sense reply: Before we can settle the matter in detail, we must...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
This bulletin has been compiled to give mine and plant operators an idea on "How to Organize for Safety." The bulletin as a whole applies to large concerns. For the small operator it will only be necessary to omit that part which applies to the larger one. The form used applies to any and...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
One of the first and most important matters which has to be determined in connection with a mining property, after it has been decided to develop it, is the class of entry which is to be used in opening it up. At this stage in the development, the factors governing the choice, providing sufficient...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
Thomas Cowperthwaite, Safety Inspector of the Calumet & Arizona Mining Company and their subsidiary companies, spoke before the Mining Club of the Bisbee Y. M. C. A. recently, and gave many pertinent suggestions on accident prevention. A few excerpts from his talk follow: "A Safety...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
This is the third bulletin of the following series: 1. Oil and its geology. 2. Prospecting for oil. 3. Drilling for oil. 4. Laws pertaining to oil. It is not intended that this bulletin should serve as a book by which! the prospector could undertake the drilling of oil wells, but only to show that...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
The bringing of the work of the State Bureau of Mines directly to the people of the State in their home towns is to be an important feature of the work of the Bureau during the next year. Regular tours of lectures will be given, one or more members of the staff being continuously in the field. In...
1918, Arizona Geological Survey
The State Bureau of Mines has had several requests regarding a constitution and by-laws for a Mine Safety or First Aid Society. The Anaconda Copper Mining Company, through Mr. John L. Boardman, has organized one of the best Mine Safety and First Aid Societies in the country, and by permission of Mr...
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
Transportation facilities, particularly with respect to wagon roads, play a greater part in the opening up and development of a mineralized district than practically any other single item and are usually one of the first matters taken into consideration by a consulting engineer while making an...
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
1. Infusible aluminum minerals (also zinc silicates) ignited before and after adding cobalt nitrate solution give an intense blue color. Fusible minerals may give blue cobalt glass whether aluminum is present or not. 2. Ammonia gives a white gelatinous precipitate in solutions containing aluminum....
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
One of the things probably less utilized to advantage among the men working in industrial communities is the other eight hours. Eight hours for work, eight hours for sleep, and eight hours for recreation, and by recreation is meant amusement, diversion, sport or pastime, or the refreshment of the...
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
In the North and Northwest, Safety and Welfare work go hand in hand, but I found that Welfare work was more or less of a myth when I first came into this vicinity. In fact, the average worker was inclined to make fun of the word, Welfare, and as one worker expressed his opinion to me not long ago...
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
Will money spent on sanitary improvements reduce accidents? We all know that money spent on sanitation reduces the sickness of a district. We know that towns having a complete sewer system enjoy better health than one which has filthy privies; that towns supplied with good milk and pure food cause...
1917, Arizona Geological Survey
Taking samples and measuring the width of an ore body are matters which everyone connected with the mining industry should be able to do properly. The purpose of this bulletin, is to describe the methods generally used by many engineers, so that one may understand how to do this very important...

About the Geological Surveys Database
https://statesurveys.americangeosciences.org

As of July 2018, the Geological Surveys Database replaces the Critical Issues Research Database, providing an improved portal for decision makers and others to locate and comprehensively search state geological survey publications and U.S. Geological Survey factsheets.

The Geological Surveys Database is now an external database that has be integrated into AGI's Critical Issues webpages. To use the entire suite of features of the Geological Surveys Database, please visit https://statesurveys.americangeosciences.org.

The Geological Surveys Database provides full-text searching of publications meaning that users can not only search metadata fields (i.e., title, author, notes, etc.), but also search against the entire text of the publications in the database in order to find the information they are seeking. The database also features interactive geographic searching of publications that have geographic coordinates, browsing of publications, faceted searching, and more.

Record display views include robust metadata that is based on a combination of GeoRef metadata that is supplemented with additional metadata from the state geological surveys and U.S. Geological Survey, links to state geological survey websites, suggestions for similar items, and a map display of associated geographic metadata coordinates.

The Geological Surveys Database also provides a wide array of user features including the ability to export citations, create user accounts to save queries, citations and create curated lists, add comments and custom tags to records in the database, and more.

The Geological Surveys Database is a collaborative effort between the American Geosciences Institute and U.S. state geological surveys to help increase the discoverability and use of geological survey publications by decision makers as they address issues at the intersection of the geosciences and society.