Geological Surveys Database

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1966, Illinois State Geological Survey
1966, Illinois State Geological Survey
Seismic reflection, gravity, and aeromagnetic surveys were used here to determine the depth to the Precambrian crystalline rocks. An inverse relation between basement structures and Bouguer gravity anomalies was found. The gravity anomalies are caused by variations in crustal densities. Low-density...
1964, Illinois State Geological Survey
Subsurface information is presented on gross lithology, facies variations, and distinguishing criteria of the stratigraphic units in seven counties in Illinois. These Cambrian and Ordovician sediments are cratonic sandstone and dolomite, with smaller amounts of shale, siltstone, and limestone....
1963, Illinois State Geological Survey
The Mississippian System is divided into the Kinderhookian, Valmeyeran, and Chesterian series. Classification of late Valmeyeran and Chesterian rocks is herein considered in light of improved correlations and the adoption of the principle of multiple classification. Youngest Valmeyeran strata...
1963, Illinois State Geological Survey
The sandstones of the Pennsylvanian and Late Mississippian sediments are one of the distinguishing characteristics of the late Paleozoic fill of the Illinois Basin. These sandstones are discussed in terms of sand-body shape, petrology, texture, and sedimentary structures. Detailed subsurface maps...
1960, Illinois State Geological Survey
A new rock-stratigraphic classification of Pennsylvanian strata of Illinois is presented in conformity with the multiple stratigraphic classification system recently adopted by the Illinois State Geological Survey. The nearly 3,000 ft. of Pennsylvanian strata have been classified into formations...
1960, Illinois State Geological Survey
The geology of Winnebago County was studied to determine its relation to the occurrence and availability of ground-water supplies in the area. Eleven bedrock formations, Precambrian, Cambrian, and Ordovician in age, are present. Glacial drift deposited during the Farmdale and Shelbyville ice...
1968, Illinois State Geological Survey
In the St. Elmo area, south-central Illinois, Kansan till buried by Illinoian till and outwash comprises the upland surface, underlain by 9,000 feet of Paleozoic strata in the Illinois basin; only the upper 300 feet, Pennsylvanian, is exposed. The fossiliferous limestones of the Bond and Mattoon...
1968, Illinois State Geological Survey
The Barry area lies within the Lincoln Hills section of the Ozark Plateau, between the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. Pleistocene ice left widespread but thin and patchy Kansan till and outwash, and thick Illinoian gravels, important as a mineral resource. Paleozoic strata in the underlying...
1968, Illinois State Geological Survey
The Thebes area, one of the few areas in Illinois where strata of Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic ages can be seen, lies on the northeast flank of the Ozark Dome and includes the northern edge of the Gulf Coastal Plain's Mississippi embayment. It is underlain by thousands of feet of strata...
1968, Illinois State Geological Survey
In a summary of glacial history of Illinois, an illustratiion shows 12 stages including 3 soil intervals; the sand and gravel, rich soils, and ground water in glacial outwash are valuable resources. Topography and surficial materials in the Princeton area are predominantly Wisconsinan; thickest...
1967, Illinois State Geological Survey
1967, Illinois State Geological Survey
1966, Illinois State Geological Survey
Descriptions of character and sequence of materials, and data on relative consistency, natural water content, and grain-size distribution are given for glacial deposits tested and sampled, as a part of a controlled drilling program, at thirteen sites in Will County and one in the southern part of...
1966, Illinois State Geological Survey
The planning of dam and reservoir sites must include careful consideration of the geologic environment. Knowledge of the principal elements of this environment—topography, hydrology, and geology—contributes to the success of a project. Various conditions in bedrock and unconsolidated deposits,...

About the Geological Surveys Database
https://statesurveys.americangeosciences.org

As of July 2018, the Geological Surveys Database replaces the Critical Issues Research Database, providing an improved portal for decision makers and others to locate and comprehensively search state geological survey publications and U.S. Geological Survey factsheets.

The Geological Surveys Database is now an external database that has be integrated into AGI's Critical Issues webpages. To use the entire suite of features of the Geological Surveys Database, please visit https://statesurveys.americangeosciences.org.

The Geological Surveys Database provides full-text searching of publications meaning that users can not only search metadata fields (i.e., title, author, notes, etc.), but also search against the entire text of the publications in the database in order to find the information they are seeking. The database also features interactive geographic searching of publications that have geographic coordinates, browsing of publications, faceted searching, and more.

Record display views include robust metadata that is based on a combination of GeoRef metadata that is supplemented with additional metadata from the state geological surveys and U.S. Geological Survey, links to state geological survey websites, suggestions for similar items, and a map display of associated geographic metadata coordinates.

The Geological Surveys Database also provides a wide array of user features including the ability to export citations, create user accounts to save queries, citations and create curated lists, add comments and custom tags to records in the database, and more.

The Geological Surveys Database is a collaborative effort between the American Geosciences Institute and U.S. state geological surveys to help increase the discoverability and use of geological survey publications by decision makers as they address issues at the intersection of the geosciences and society.