Geotimes

Geotimes is a free electronic newsfeed for the geoscience community. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits Geotimes, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community. Do you have a geoscience blog or newsfeed with an RSS feed? It may be a good fit for Geotimes. To learn more about RSS or to submit information to Geotimes by email, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org. Events can also be listed on the AGI Geoscience Calendar.

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Mon, 2019-02-04 06:19
How can geology help with the decarbonisation of our society? Continue reading →
Sun, 2019-02-03 19:30
The swarm appears to be occurring on a right-lateral reverse fault that connects the San Andreas and Mendocino Fracture Zone with the shallow portion of the Cascadia Megathrust.
Sun, 2019-02-03 01:22
Kirk R. Johnson – Cruisin’ the Fossil Coastline: The Travels of an Artist and a Scientist Along the Shores of the Prehistoric Pacific https://www.politics-prose.com/event/book/kirk-r-johnson-cruisin-fossil-coastline-travels-of-artist-and-scientist-along-shores-of Sunday, February 3, 2019 – 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Johnson’s sequel to Cruisin’ the Fossil Freeway takes readers up the Pacific coast from Mexico to Alaska in search of fossils and the people fascinated with them. Again partnering with the artist Ray Troll, Johnson, a paleobotanist and the Sant Director of the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History, flies, boats, and drives through one of the richest troves of fossils on the continent. He visits museums and labs as well as the far-flung sites that have turned up creatures like pygmy mammoths, oyster bears, immense ammonites, shark-bitten camels, polar dinosaurs, Alaskan palms, California walruses, and a lava-baked rhinoceros. A combination field...
Sat, 2019-02-02 16:20
The megathrust fault lacks large subduction zone earthquakes in this region. What do these extensional earthquakes tell us?
Thu, 2019-01-31 16:34
As previously announced, after two decades of distinguished service to the AAG, Doug Richardson, will retire as Executive Director in early 2020. The AAG Council has assembled a Search Committee composed of current Council members and other experienced geographers to work on the important task of recruiting a new Executive Director. The Search Committee members […]
Thu, 2019-01-31 16:00
Applications now open for the 2019 MEISPP summer internship program.
Thu, 2019-01-31 11:34
Every year, the Honors Banquet is a highlight for me at the AGU Fall Meeting. While I am always impressed with the descriptions of the honorees’ amazing contributions to the Earth and space sciences, what I enjoy most are the heartfelt thanks that the honorees offer to those who have helped them along the way. Their sincere acknowledgements of their mentors serve as a reminder that great science is rarely achieved in isolation. My interest in mentoring over the past two decades has been driven by this recognition. I want to give everyone an equal shot at great science. I strongly believe that if our community is interested in cultivating an atmosphere that produces excellence in the Earth and space sciences, then we should be equally committed to excellence in mentoring. From my vantage point, the two go hand in hand. In the Earth and space science communities, access to mentors and mentoring has not always been equal. Studies have shown stark differences in access related to gender,...
Thu, 2019-01-31 10:35
Three new interns have joined the AAG staff this spring semester! The AAG would like to welcome Matilda, Crystal, and Jessica to the organization. Matilda Kreider is a junior at George Washington University pursuing a B.A. in political communication with a minor in geography. Matilda is interested in communicating science to the public through museums […]
Thu, 2019-01-31 10:00
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study some of the oldest and faintest stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have made an unexpected finding. They discovered a dwarf galaxy in our cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away. The finding is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.
Wed, 2019-01-30 10:19
We're delighted to announce the two winners of the first ever Zeiss-GSL Scholarship, awarded for innovative microscopy in Earth science related projects! Continue reading →

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