Geotimes

Geotimes is the free electronic blog of the geosciences. Originally launched as GeoSpectrum, a newsletter of the American Geosciences Institute in 1995, Geotimes has been reborn as the go-to source of information on AGI's 51 Member Societies. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits the blog, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community.

To submit information to Geotimes, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org.

InTeGrate Announces the Publication of a New Materials

InTeGrate is developing a new breed of teaching materials that can be utilized in general education courses, teacher preparation courses, core courses within geoscience majors, and courses designed for other majors including environmental studies, social science, engineering, and other sciences.

Critical Issues Monthly Roundup: August 2017

A satellite image of the Earth. Image Credit: NASA

Welcome to September! Here’s what’s new from the Critical Issues Program:

  • We are pleased to announce the publication of the final report for our 2016 Critical Issues Forum, “Addressing Changes in Regional Groundwater Resources: Lessons from the High Plains Aquifer.” This forum brought together a wide range of scientists, economists, water managers, policy experts, students, water industry professionals, and representatives from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations, to share perspectives on groundwater management, monitoring, and use in the High Plains and further afield. You can download a free copy of this report here. Videos of the presentations are available here.
  • On August 2nd we held our most recent webinar, “Building the Modern World: Geoscience that Underlies our Economic Prosperity.” This webinar, based on a June 12th Congressional briefing, focused on the fundamental geoscientific underpinnings of our nation’s infrastructure, from building materials and construction projects to hazard mitigation and coastal planning. If you missed the live webinar you can find a video recording, copies of the presenters’ slides, and additional resources by clicking here.
Click "Read More" to see more news.

InTeGrate 2017 Fall Webinar Series Kicks Off

Free and open to the public, this series will incorporate InTeGrate pedagogies into teaching practices, provide resources available for adoption, and create a forum for participants to learn and share teaching strategies.

Assessing the Impact of InTeGrate Materials in Introductory Environmental Science and Botany Courses

Thursday, August 31
Registration deadline is August 29, 2017

Benchmarks: August 31, 1886: Magnitude-7 earthquake rocks Charleston, South Carolina

In late August 1886, Charleston, S.C., was in the grip of a heat wave. It was so hot during the day that many offices were closed and events were postponed until later in the evening when temperatures had cooled. So, when powerful seismic waves rippled across the city at 9:51 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 1886, people were sent scrambling not just out of homes, theaters and the opera house, but out of churches, offices and other buildings in which they might not have otherwise been at that late hour.
Read more

Reconstructing ancient oxidant levels and their climatic effects

Oxidants in the troposphere, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals, influence the life spans of other atmospheric components, including pollutants and greenhouse gases like carbon monoxide and methane. But how the abundance of tropospheric oxidants varies as climate changes is poorly understood. Part of the challenge is that these oxidants are too reactive to be preserved in paleo-records, such as ice cores.
Read more

Asymmetrical fossil feathers fill in timeline of flight

To get off the ground and evolve into flying birds, dinosaurs got a lift from asymmetrical feathers, which are more aerodynamic than symmetrical feathers. The discovery of a new species of asymmetrically feathered dinosaur in northeastern China from the Early Cretaceous is helping fill in the timeline of adaptations that led to flight.
Read more

Coatings may prevent pipeline clogs

When ice forms in household water pipes, blockages and expansion can cause the pipes to burst. Similar problems can arise in the transportation of oil and gas when ice-like substances called gas hydrates build up inside pipelines — an issue traditionally mitigated by insulating pipes or by using antifreeze additives. But in a new study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, researchers report an alternative solution: specialized coatings for the inside of oil and gas pipes that prevent hydrate buildups and clogs. The coatings could prove more reliable than the usual approaches, but whether the method can be applied cost-effectively on a large scale is uncertain.
Read more

Pages