Geotimes

Geotimes is a free electronic newsfeed for the geoscience community. Originally launched as GeoSpectrum, a newsletter of the American Geosciences Institute in 1995, Geotimes has been reborn as the go-to source of information on AGI's 52 Member Societies. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits Geotimes, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community.

Do you have a geoscience blog or newsfeed with an RSS feed? It may be a good fit for Geotimes. To learn more about RSS or to submit information to Geotimes by email, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org.

Click the corresponding image to see the full article or post.

Important Job Choice Factors for the Early-Career Geoscience Workforce

Currents #: 

121
Thursday, October 19, 2017
AGI’s Geoscience Student Exit Survey has been conducted with graduating students completing their bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral geoscience degrees for the past 5 years. AGI followed up with approximately 1250 recent graduate respondents. This follow-up survey investigated their career path up to September 2017, the factors they consider when choosing a job,
and the skills and knowledge gained since entering the workforce. This survey collected 332 responses (27% response rate)--163 bachelor’s graduates, 101 master’s graduates, and 68 doctoral graduates.
 

American Geosciences Institute Announces 2018 Award Winners

AGI glyph

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to recognize the recipients of its 2018 awards: Professor Iain S. Stewart with the AGI Award for Outstanding Contribution to Public Understanding of the Geosciences; Mr. Richard M. Powers with the William B. Heroy Jr. Award for Distinguished Service to AGI; and Mr. Russell G. Slayback with the AGI Medal in Memory of Ian Campbell for Superlative Service to the Geosciences, its highest award. All three awardees will be presented with their awards next week at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Seattle.

Earth Anatomy Revealed: Geologic Mapping for Our Future

Pardee advertisement.

Are you attending the Geological Society of America (GSA) annual meeting in Seattle this year? If so, please join us on the morning of Wednesday October 25th for an exciting Pardee symposium, "Earth Anatomy Revealed: Geologic Mapping for Our Future". Details on this Pardee Symposium can be found at http://bit.ly/EarthAnatomyPardee.

'Citywide Celebrations' Give Earth Science Week 2017 a Local Focus

Earth Science Week Theme for 2017 is Earth and Human Activity

How does your town celebrate Earth Science Week? The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) was pleased to support city-specific celebrations of its annual geoscience awareness campaign, Earth Science Week, which took place October 8-14, 2017. Major American cities such as Houston, Denver, and Washington, D.C., served as major centers of public awareness activities.

Now Accepting Applications for 2018 Award for Excellence in Earth Science Teaching

2017 Edward C. Roy, Jr Award Winner M. J. Tykoski
The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is accepting applications for the 2018 Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award for Excellence in Earth Science Teaching. Given annually, this award is presented to one teacher of grades K-8 in the United States or Key Stages 1-3 in the United Kingdom each year. The award recognizes leadership and innovation in Earth science education.

EarthScope's Transportable Array now spans Alaska, the last frontier

EarthScope Logo

Seismic station A19K, it’s called, and it’s now at the edge of an abandoned airstrip far above the Arctic Circle. The nearest population center is 127 miles northeast in Utqiaġvik (formerly known as Barrow), the northernmost city in the United States. What a way to celebrate Earth Science Week, Oct. 8-14, 2017.

Read the full news release from NSF.

Critical Issues Adventures in Boston

The Lawn On D (across street from Boston Convention Center). The opening reception, which had a "Bostonopoly" theme, took place among games, performers, tasty food, and lots of mingling among attendees.

On August 5, I packed my bags and headed north to Boston for the annual meeting of the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). Enroute, memories of my one visit to a wintry Boston as a teenager came back to me... memories of trying to stay warm, seeing my first 3-foot blizzard, and having a blast making snowmen and exploring the historic city with my classmates for an extra five days while the airports dug out from the storm. Fortunately, as I stepped off the plane this time, the weather was mild and dry –a great start to the five days I would spend in Boston promoting the geosciences to lawmakers from around the U.S. and the world.

Pages