Geotimes

Geotimes is the free electronic blog of the geosciences. Originally launched as GeoSpectrum, a newsletter of the American Geosciences Institute in 1995, Geotimes has been reborn as the go-to source of information on AGI's 51 Member Societies. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits the blog, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community.

To submit information to Geotimes, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org.

Earthquakes make volcanoes more — and less — gassy

Triggering of volcanic emissions by earthquakes has been observed since antiquity. The Roman naturalist and philosopher Pliny the Elder proposed the link as early as A.D. 77, and in “The Voyage of the Beagle,” Charles Darwin wrote about inland eruptions in Chile closely following an offshore earthquake in 1835. More recent statistical studies show that after large earthquakes, volcanic activity around the world increases. But the lack of robust monitoring equipment at most volcanoes has made it hard to quantify the relationship. In a new study, scientists demonstrate how satellites can be used to track changes in sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanoes after seismic events, offering a potential way to study the often elusive link between seismicity and volcanism.
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Call for Abstracts - Seismology of the Americas #earthquake

Coral Beach, Isla Verde, Puerto Rico
The Seismological Society of America and the Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission have put out a call for sessions for the 2018 "Seismology of the Americas" Meeting. Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to: recent major earthquakes; earthquake early warning

Transylvanian ice cave reveals European winter climate record

Over the last 10,000 years, water dripping into a cave in Transylvania has frozen into one of the largest and oldest cave glaciers in the world. Today, the Scărișoara Ice Cave in central Romania preserves one of the longest ice records on Earth, a boon for climate researchers seeking to study how Europe’s climate has fluctuated during the Holocene.
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Ancient wildfires suggest rising atmospheric oxygen helped end past ocean anoxia

Many times throughout Earth’s history, oxygen levels in the world’s oceans have decreased dramatically in episodes called oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), which have caused massive marine die-offs. In the Early Jurassic, for example, the Toarcian OAE has been linked with the extinction of many ammonite species and other sea life. However, how such episodes end remains largely unclear to scientists.
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Dust influences pollution levels in eastern China

Air pollution often enshrouds cities in eastern China in a thick haze that impairs visibility and causes respiratory health problems. Emissions from human activity are mainly to blame, but climate researchers now report that natural forces — namely, dust kicked into the air by wind — can also exert a strong control over how much pollution persists in the air.
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