Geotimes

Geotimes is the free electronic blog of the geosciences. Originally launched as GeoSpectrum, a newsletter of the American Geosciences Institute in 1995, Geotimes has been reborn as the go-to source of information on AGI's 51 Member Societies. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits the blog, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community.

To submit information to Geotimes, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org.

When Does a Rock Become Soil? SSSA Shares! #soil

Measuring soil color.
Soils and rocks are inextricably related, and geoscientists study both. The Soil Science Society of America answers one VERY important question in their Soils Matter blog, and that is, "When does a rock become soil?" Learn the recipe for making soils, and breakdown when a soil becomes a rock (pun intended) in their latest post!

 

 

Professional Protip: Job Interview Questions from AGU Career Services #workforce

Job Interview
The American Geophysical Union (AGU) published a helpful piece in Eos for any scientist who has, or may, seek employment straight from the AGU Career Services and Talent Pool team members. Readers are walked through the traditional interview questions, and some of the best ways to answer them. Definitely a piece all geos should check out! Interested in more information about a career in the geosciences?

A mammoth king: Was the legend of King Hygelac in "Beowulf" inspired by a fossil find?

Some literary and scientific sleuthing suggests that the eighth-century discovery and misidentification of fossil mammoth bones on the Rhine-Meuse River Delta could have led to the monsters and characters of “Beowulf.”

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Young Costa Rican lavas might reflect pockets of primordial mantle

During the Archean, between 4 billion and 2.5 billion years ago, Earth’s super-heated young mantle produced a unique type of lava known as komatiite. In a new study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers looking at 90-million-year-old komatiites in Costa Rica — by far the youngest komatiites ever found — suggest the modern mantle may still harbor pockets of intense heat reminiscent of early Earth.
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Young Costa Rican lavas might reflect pockets of primordial mantle

During the Archean, between 4 billion and 2.5 billion years ago, Earth’s super-heated young mantle produced a unique type of lava known as komatiite. In a new study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers looking at 90-million-year-old komatiites in Costa Rica — by far the youngest komatiites ever found — suggest the modern mantle may still harbor pockets of intense heat reminiscent of early Earth.
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Why meteors snap, crackle and pop

Keen-eared observers sometimes report hearing popping, whistling or buzzing at the same time they see meteors pass far overhead, a perplexing phenomenon called the electrophonic effect. What causes the effect — or if it’s even real — has been discussed for centuries; famed astronomer Edmond Halley is said to have dismissed it as a figment of people’s imaginations. In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, researchers suggest that not only is it real, but that it is caused by radio waves induced by meteors and converted to sound waves near Earth’s surface.
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