Geotimes

Geotimes is the free electronic blog of the geosciences. Originally launched as GeoSpectrum, a newsletter of the American Geosciences Institute in 1995, Geotimes has been reborn as the go-to source of information on AGI's 51 Member Societies. The American Geosciences Institute coordinates and edits the blog, but it is the result of contributed materials from societies, geoscience organizations and others in the community.

To submit information to Geotimes, please contact Joe Lilek at geotimes@americangeosciences.org.

Stock traders' algorithm finds slow earthquakes

Traders in financial markets use a variety of computer algorithms to help them decide when to buy or sell different stocks. Geologists have now adapted one of these algorithms to improve detection of subtle slow-slip events along faults, paving the way for a better understanding of regional seismic hazards.
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Abstracts due August 15th for "The Sinkhole Conference"

A sinkhole in front of a home in Kentucky. Image Credit: FEMA/Photo by Rob Melendez

The Multidisciplinary Conference on Sinkholes and the Engineering and Environmental Impacts of Karst, generally called “The Sinkhole Conference,” is the longest-running international conference of its type. Since 1984, engineers, geologists, hydrologists, land managers, biologists, and many others have gathered at these meetings to exchange cutting-edge information on karst and its many benefits and challenges. Abstracts may be submitted until 15 August 2017, after which will be the time to submit your papers to accompany your abstracts. The papers of past Sinkhole Conferences have made those proceedings highly sought and widely cited. We expect the proceedings of the upcoming meeting will be the best yet.

Titan's oddly oriented dunes may be electrostatically sculpted

Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, which has a dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere with evidence of large amounts of frozen water at the surface, is a world apart from Earth’s moon. Among other strange phenomena, Titan has vast fields of frozen hydrocarbon particles that form 100-meter-tall dunes whose crests point east, opposite the prevailing west-blowing winds predicted by atmospheric models of Titan. In a new study in Nature Geoscience, researchers have found that these mysterious dunes may be sculpted in part by electrostatic charging of the frozen hydrocarbon grains.
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Critical Issues Monthly Roundup: July 2017

Earth
Critical Issues Monthly Roundup: July 2017

Welcome to August! Here’s what’s new from the Critical Issues Program:

  • On July 6th we held our most recent webinar, “Planning for Coastal Storm & Erosion Hazards,” which focused on efforts to anticipate, mitigate, and respond to coastal storms, erosion, and associated hazards at the federal, state, and local level, including case studies from California, Texas, and Georgia. Thank you to the more than 800 people who registered and over 500 who attended live. If you missed the live webinar you can find a video recording, copies of the presenters’ slides, and additional resources by clicking here.
  • Our next webinar will be tomorrow, August 2nd, at 3:00 pm EDT, entitled “Building the Modern World: Geoscience that Underlies our Economic Prosperity.” This webinar, based on a June 12th Congressional briefing, will focus on the fundamental geoscientific underpinnings of our nation’s infrastructure, from building materials and construction projects to hazard mitigation and coastal planning. You can still register for this webinar here.
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Evidence of devastating drought found beneath the Dead Sea

The Dead Sea, a landlocked lake bordered by Israel, Jordan and Palestine, is nearly 10 times saltier than the ocean. And it’s getting saltier. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the water level has dropped by nearly 30 meters, largely because of diversions of the Jordan River, the lake’s primary tributary and the arid region’s main source of fresh water.
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Explore the Science of AGI's Member Organizations at #GSA2017

Eavesdropping on Old Faithful

The Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park has erupted predictably within a 10-minute window every hour for more than 150 years, but the inner workings that power its regular 30-meter-high eruptive plumes are largely still a mystery. Recent monitoring of the gusher is revealing new secrets about its plumbing system, which may help the National Park Service plan for future infrastructure expansions around the popular attraction.
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