Broadening Ocean Current Could Carry Less Heat Poleward With Climate Change

Broadening Ocean Current Could Carry Less Heat Poleward With Climate Change
2/24/2017
 
What would happen if an ocean current were pushed off course - and why might that occur? The Agulhas Current, which flows southwest along the eastern coast of Africa, presents an opportunity to test these questions. Although the conventional understanding suggests that currents would intensify along their existing paths, a recent study in Nature suggests that stronger surface winds are causing the Agulhas' path to broaden and meander, and to become more chaotic. In the March issue of EARTH Magazine, the effects of this broadening are addressed, including implications for the Arctic and the tropics, as well as for ocean productivity and nutrient flow. Get the full story in EARTH: https://www.earthmagazine.org/article/broadening-ocean-current-could-carry-less-heat-poleward-climate-change.
 
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Keep up to date with the latest happenings in Earth, energy and environment news with EARTH Magazine online at www.earthmagazine.org. Published by the American Geosciences Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.
 
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The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.
 
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