EARTH: Hidden Double Earthquakes Spells Trouble for Tsunami Warning Systems

EARTH: Hidden Double Earthquakes Spells Trouble for Tsunami Warning Systems
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
3/8/2016
 
Alexandria VA - A magnitude-7.1 earthquake struck Chile on Jan. 2, 2011, or so scientists thought. Now, with increasing sensor sensitivity and advances in the quantitative analysis of earthquakes, scientists have revealed that this quake was actually a doublet. This meant that instead of just one massive quake, two similarly large earthquakes struck very near to one another within seconds. 
 
The closely spaced doublet was missed by global monitoring networks during the initial aftermath of the quake, and, as EARTH Magazine explores, it presents a major challenge to earthquake and tsunami warning systems. Experts agree this is a challenge that must be brought to the forefront of seismic research.
 
Examine the occurrence of other doublet earthquakes and possible solutions to these problems in EARTH Magazine: http://bit.ly/21WdmzM.
 
For more stories like this, subscribe to EARTH Magazine at www.earthmagazine.org. The March 2016 issue is filled with stories that bring you the science behind the headlines, such as new research on what causes a supervolcano to erupt, the ever-growing field of avalanche science, and evidence in the fossil record that may support courtship between dinosaurs. 
 
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Keep up to date with the latest happenings in Earth, energy and environment news with EARTH Magazine online at: http://www.earthmagazine.org/. Published by the American Geosciences Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.
 
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The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.
 

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