Press Releases

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been an energy industry practice for decades, originating as a mechanism to enhance oil and gas recovery. But carbon dioxide gas is tricky to capture, and even trickier to store: Without airtight sealants and careful monitoring, the gas seeps up through cracks in the subsurface and quickly reenters the atmosphere. But what if the carbon dioxide could be instead stored as rock?

Friday, June 2, 2017 - 12:30

The American Geosciences Institute congratulates Mary Schultz on her recent selection as the 2017-2018 William L. Fisher Congressional Geoscience Fellow. Schultz will begin her Fellowship in Washington, D.C., on September 1, 2017, after receiving her Ph.D. in Geological Sciences from Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz., on June 14, 2017.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 - 17:00
In 1883, the Grecian, a merchant ship bound from Philadelphia to Portugal, was caught in a raging storm. When hope was almost lost, a rescue vessel, the Martha Cobb, spotted them and rushed to their aid. But with the storm still overhead, how did they succeed? Find out in EARTH Magazine.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 13:00
Plate tectonics has been a centerpiece of earth science for decades, but Earth didn't always have tectonic plates. As the planet coalesced from cosmic dust approximately 4.6 billion years ago, it had a single, unbroken lithosphere. So how and when did the plates break apart and begin their seemingly never-ending round of musical chairs?
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:30
On May 9, EARTH News Editor Timothy Oleson went to check out the National Hurricane Awareness Tour's stop in Washington, D.C., at Ronald Reagan National Airport, where he sat down with National Hurricane Center (NHC) director Rick Knabb to learn more about the tour and efforts to track and forecast tropical storms.
Friday, May 12, 2017 - 08:00
Collecting weather data can be hazardous, but with wind speeds exceeding 200 miles per hour, flying debris, and steep gradients in both air pressure and temperature, the inside of a tornado might just be the ultimate extreme. As EARTH Magazine examines in its May issue, a team of research engineers led by Georgios Vatistas at Concordia University in Montreal is exploring this harsh environment from a safe distance by using computer models to estimate temperature changes inside tornadoes.
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 09:30
Leading up to Earth Science Week 2017, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) invites you to enter its new "Earth Connections" contest. Submit a 30- to 90-second original video that tells viewers about how people have an impact on Earth systems, or how Earth systems have an impact on people, in your part of the world.
Friday, April 21, 2017 - 16:46
The American Geosciences Institute is pleased to announce the release of the Directory of Geoscience Departments, 52nd Edition.
Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 16:26
Alexandria, VA - The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) once again is sponsoring a photo contest in celebration of Earth Science Week. What’s more, the contest, which honors this year's event theme of "Earth and Human Activity," features a new twist.
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 14:30
A silent spring and a summer without honey? Current events have renewed interest in science that informs us about the health of our environment. In EARTH Magazine's May cover story, read about efforts to track where and how certain pesticides are making their way offsite, staying in the environment for longer than previously thought, and potentially endangering beneficial species like honey bees and aquatic invertebrates.
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 12:30

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