News and Announcements

During the Second Punic War, Hannibal, in a brazen move, led a massive army over the Alps, surprising the Romans from the supposedly impenetrable northern border. The exact route Hannibal took is unknown, although some geographic information can be gleaned from historical accounts such as those of the Roman writer Polybius. Armed with this information, and the knowledge that tens of thousands of men, horses and elephants must have left some trace, geoscientists are hunting down possible locations using deduction and chemistry to test hypotheses.
Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 16:21
Celebrate the fourth annual Geologic Map Day! On October 14, as a part of the Earth Science Week 2016 activities, join leading geoscience organizations in promoting awareness of the importance of geologic mapping to society.
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 14:23
In the August issue of EARTH Magazine, explore some of geology's most historic images, and hear from experts about what made these depictions so valuable to the field and why they continue to be useful educational resources.
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 11:54
The American Geosciences Institute recognized Ernie Mancini at the 2016 AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition held in Calgary, Alberta. He will formally accept this award at the AGI Past President's dinner that will be held at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in September 2016.
Wednesday, July 13, 2016 - 15:19
Last summer, while the abandoned Gold King Mine in Colorado was being studied for acid mine drainage, the earthen plug blew out, releasing millions of gallons of acid mine water into the Animas River, which eventually drains into the San Juan and Colorado rivers and ultimately Lake Powell. The images were startling, but this event added momentum to the national dialog on remediating abandoned mine lands. EARTH Magazine explores the role geoscience plays in this process.
Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 12:19
This free webcast, narrated by AGI Outreach Associate Brendan Soles, provides an overview of the photography, visual arts, essay, and video contests.
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 - 14:51
The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is now accepting advance orders for the Earth Science Week 2016 Toolkit. The Toolkit contains educational materials for all ages that correspond to this year's event theme, "Our Shared Geoheritage."
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 11:24
The soil deposits, topographical relief and climate present a well-known hazard to Stillaguamish, Wash., region, but the devastating Oso landslide made determining how many others had occurred in the past in the valley imperative.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 16:07
A 2002 eruption of Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that killed more than 100 people also triggered an earthquake eight months later that shook the town of Kalehe in the Lake Kivu region. EARTH Magazine explores just what happened to better understand a region that is being pulled apart by plate tectonics.
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 - 15:10
As the U.S. celebrates National Oceans Month in June, scientists who study the seafloor are excited because they believe that humans will end this century with a far better view of our seafloor than at any other time in human history. Geoscientists have been mapping land on Earth, and even other planets in our solar system, in high definition for years, but the picture of the ocean floor has remained blurry for the most part. But with advances in engineering, what lies beneath is starting to come into much better focus.
Friday, June 3, 2016 - 12:26

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