RFG 2018 Conference

coal

Evaluation of Available Resources of the Pittsburgh (No. 8) Coal Bed in Ohio

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Geological Survey (Ohio Geological Survey) performed an estimation of the remaining and available resources of the Pittsburgh (No. 8) coal bed in Ohio. This study represents the first statewide estimation of Pittsburgh coal resources in 14 years. The Pittsburgh (No. 8) coal is the most heavily mined coal bed in Ohio, representing 64 percent of the total coal mined within the state. Data points were collected to create base-elevation structure and isopach maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. The base elevation structure raster was constructed from 47,714 data points using the Natural Neighbor interpolation technique. Sequential Gaussian simulation was used to create isopach maps from 2,725 data points, which were then summarized by county to obtain coal tonnages. Project results reveal that the Pittsburgh (No. 8) coal bed had an estimated 7.9 billion short tons of coal in Ohio before mining. Of that amount, 3.4 billion short tons have been mined and approximately 4.5 billion short tons remain. Of the remaining resources, 348 million short tons are available for surface mining and 2.6 billion short tons are available for underground mining. The majority of the available resources exist in Belmont County (777 million short tons) and Monroe County (1.1 billion short tons). Given that the current rate of mining for the Pittsburgh (No. 8) coal is 14 million short tons per year, these resources will last for more than a century.

Evaluation of Available Resources of the Lower Freeport (No. 6a) Coal Bed in Ohio

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Geological Survey (Ohio Geological Survey) performed an estimation of the remaining and available coal resources of the Lower Freeport (No. 6a) coal bed in Ohio. This study represents the first statewide estimation of Lower Freeport coal resources in 55 years. Data points were collected to create base-elevation structure and isopach maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. The base-elevation structure map was constructed from 7,190 data points using the Natural Neighbor interpolation technique. Sequential Gaussian simulation was used to create isopach maps from 3,277 data points, which were then summarized by county to obtain coal tonnages. Project results reveal that the Lower Freeport coal bed had an estimated 6.2 billion short tons of coal in Ohio before mining. Of that amount, 400 million short tons have been mined and approximately 5.8 billion tons remain. Of the remaining resources, 41 million short tons are available for surface mining, and 2.2 billion short tons are available for underground mining. The majority of the available resources exist in Harrison County (638 million short tons) and Jefferson County (625 million short tons). Given that the current rate of mining for the Lower Freeport is approximately 700,000 short tons per year, these resources will last for more than a century.

Energy Resource Potential of the Mesozoic Basins in Virginia

The information in this report was compiled for and presented to the participants of the 2008 Southeastern U.S. Mesozoic Basins Energy Resources Potential Workshop held in Charlottesville, Virginia. In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey published a new assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Coast Mesozoic basins of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge Thrust Belt, Atlantic Coast Plain, and New England Provinces. The Taylorsville, Richmond and Dan River-Danville basins, which are wholly or partially in Virginia, were included, but the other exposed and buried basins in Virginia were not assessed. The potential reservoirs in the basins that were assessed are continuous accumulations in lithologies that include sandstone, mudstone, and coal. It was estimated that these accumulations are most likely to contain natural gas with associated natural gas liquids.

2014 Annual coalbed-methane regional groundwater monitoring report: Powder River Basin, Montana

Montana and the surrounding states have a unique geology that presents many opportunities for valuable continuing research on mineral deposits. Research centered on economic geology and mineralogy can lead to a better understanding of the mineral deposits in this region, and thus the discovery of future exploration targets that have potential for development into operating mines. Mining has long been, and will continue to be, vital to the economy of Montana and the surrounding region.

The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology hosted its first Mining and Minerals Symposium on the Montana Tech campus, May 8–10, 2015, to provide a forum for the presentation of economic geological and mineralogical research. The symposium was designed for professionals, students, and non-professionals all to participate and present ideas. The intent of this symposium was to encourage future and ongoing economic geology research in Montana and the surrounding region, and to provide an opportunity for those conducting such research in the northwestern states to present and discuss their work.

Presentations covered a variety of topics, including ore genesis, mineralogy, mining methods, and mineral resource geology covering Montana and South Dakota. Abstracts submitted by the speakers are presented in the following meeting proceedings.

Interactive map of coal mines in Iowa

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources's (DNR) interactive map of coal mines in Iowa shows the locations of coal mines and mine entrances throughout Iowa, and also has the option to search the map by street address. Users may click on the map to access information about mine use dates, type, mining method, entrance type, and links to original mine maps.

Click here to use the Iowa DNR's interactive map of coal mines in Iowa

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