critical issues

Geoscience In Your State

Discover state-specific geoscience information that is decision-relevant and rich with links to credible and impartial sources

Delve into a variety of information resources to learn about how geoscience is being applied in your state in five main topical areas: climate, water, minerals, energy and hazards.

Choose your state from the list below to learn more.

Geoscience for Community Priorities

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Background:
The geosciences provide valuable knowledge and tools that can be applied to a wide range of community issues, including air and water quality; geologic hazards; the provision of energy, water, and mineral resources; climate and weather impacts; and the construction and maintenance of infrastructure. Geoscientists are commonly keen to see this science put into action, but there are many factors that affect how geoscience is perceived and used in community decision-making. Communities vary tremendously in size, location, culture, history, resources, governance, priorities, and needs. Effective engagement strategies take account of this diversity and employ a range of approaches to support communities and individual decision-makers with science that they can trust, understand, and use.

In this webinar, experts in geoscience communication, education, and engagement discuss a variety of different techniques, media, and principles for more effective communication and collaboration between community leaders, decision makers, and geoscientists. Particular attention is paid to three types of engagement: facilitating community-led solutions by connecting community leaders with geoscientists; incorporating community issues into college-level geoscience curricula; and using online platforms to provide geoscience information, resources, access to expertise, and opportunities for communities facing similar issues to share their experiences.

Our speakers are:

Thank you to our media partners, the American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Association of Women Geoscientists, Council on Undergraduate Research, National Association of Geoscience Teachers, National Association of State Boards of Geology, and the Soil Science Society of America.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about geoscience in communities.

Communities and Scientists Working Together

Interactive database for geologic maps of the United States

The U.S. Geological Survey hosts the National Geologic Map Database (NGMDB). This interactive tool serves as a national archive for high-quality, standardized geologic maps created by the U.S. Geological Survey and state geological surveys.

The MapView section of the NGMDB displays geologic maps from across the country dating back to 1879. The database is searchable by address, and results can be narrowed further using scale and date filters.

Interactive database for topographic maps of the United States

The U.S. Geological Survey hosts topoView, an interactive database of the survey’s topographic maps.

The map is searchable by address, and clicking on any point on the map brings up topographic maps of the area dating back to 1879. Map results can be narrowed further using scale and date filters.

Clicking the “show” option will overlay the selected map onto the coordinates of topoView’s base map. Adjusting the map overlay transparency allows comparison of historical and present-day topography.

All maps in topoView are downloadable in multiple formats.

Interactive map of California earthquake hazard zones

The California Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Zone Application (EQ Zapp) is an interactive map that details the risk of earthquakes and related hazards for different areas of the state.

The map is searchable by address, and it maps three main hazard zones:

  • Fault zones
  • Landslide zones
  • Liquefaction zones

The map also displays areas that have not yet been evaluated for liquefaction or landslides.

Click here to access the interactive map.

Interactive map of permitted oil and gas wells in Florida

The Florida Geological Survey hosts an interactive map of permitted oil and gas wells in the state.

Information is searchable by address, and sites are organized into the following categories:

  • InjectionProducer
  • Saltwater Disposal
  • Plugged & Abandoned
  • Dry Hole
  • Junked
  • Never Drilled
  • Temporarily Abandoned

Clicking on a specific site gives information such as the well field name, operating company, and permit number. Data sets can be downloaded for further use and analysis.

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