RFG 2018 Conference

earthquake

New Research Suggests Earthquake Risk Models Should Account for Syrian Refugees

As the Syrian Civil War enters its sixth year, seismic hazard might not immediately come to mind, but there is a reason it should. According to research presented at the AGU Fall Meeting, new estimates of the number of earthquake fatalities that could be expected in Turkey under several potential earthquake scenarios are 3 to 20 percent higher when Syrian refugees are counted in seismic risk models. In the April issue of EARTH Magazine, read how researchers at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville made this discovery, which will provide vital data for disaster mitigation and response efforts.

Water Infrastructure Project Wins a top ASCE Civil Engineering Award #water

Photo taken from a helicopter of the Olivenhain Dam and reservoir near Escondido, CA. Photo by Phil Konstantin
San Diego county can rest a bit more easily should a major earthquake, or another disaster disrupt supply of water it imports. The 25 year project investing in San Diego's water infrastructure won the American Society of Civil Engineers' Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement (OCEA) Award.

Tectonic summaries of magnitude 7 and greater earthquakes from 2000 to 2015

This paper describes the tectonic summaries for all magnitude 7 and larger earthquakes in the period 2000–2015, as produced by the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center during their routine response operations to global earthquakes. The goal of such summaries is to provide important event-specific information to the public rapidly and concisely, such that recent earthquakes can be understood within a global and regional seismotectonic framework. We compile these summaries here to provide a long-term archive for this information, and so that the variability in tectonic setting and earthquake history from region to region, and sometimes within a given region, can be more clearly understood.

State Responses to Induced Earthquakes

Friday, April 14, 2017

The surge in recent years of earthquake activity associated with some oil and gas operations, most notably in Oklahoma, has spurred a range of actions and responses from state geoscientists and regulators. States have taken measures to monitor these earthquakes and moderate the activities that may be causing them, particularly the deep underground injection of large volumes of wastewater. Many states with extensive oil and gas operations but little or no increased earthquake activity have also adopted practices to prevent and prepare for potential induced earthquakes in their area.

Our speakers are:

  • Jeremy Boak, Ph.D., Director, Oklahoma Geological Survey, Mewbourne College of Earth & Energy, University of Oklahoma | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video
  • Michael H. Young, Ph.D., Associate Director for Environment, Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video
  • Steven Dade, Geologist 2, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil & Gas Resources Management | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video

Webinar Co-Sponsors
American Association of Petroleum Geologists, American Energy Society, American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Association of American State Geologists, Association of Environmental & Engineering GeologistsEnvironmental and Engineering Geophysical Society, Environmental Defense Fund, Seismological Society of AmericaSociety of Exploration GeophysicistsU.S. Geological Survey.

Downloads:
pdf download icon Webinar flyer
YouTube download icon Short video showing the increases in wastewater injection volume and earthquake activity in the Fort Worth Basin, Texas, from 2005-2016.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Critical Issues Research Database for reports and factsheets about induced earthquakes.

 

State Responses: Patterns of Induced Seismicity in Central and Northwest Oklahoma

Farzad Naeim to be Awarded the 2017 Bruce A. Bolt Medal

Photo of 2017 Bruce Bolt Medal Winner Farzad Naeim
Farzad Naeim (M. EERI, 1983), President of Farzad Naeim, Inc. and Adjunct Professor of Engineering at University of California, Irvine, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Bruce A. Bolt Medal. He is recognized for more than three decades of contributions to earthquake engineering, technology and public policy through projects like his ongoing work with the City of Los Angeles to develop regulations for the design and construction of very tall buildings. He also demonstrates extraordinary leadership transferring knowledge into practice to improve seismic safety. 

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