geoscience

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Examples from the Great Lakes

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Less than one-third of the U.S. is mapped at the level of detail necessary to make informed planning decisions on a local scale concerning natural resources, natural hazards, infrastructure planning, and environmental stewardship. In the Great Lakes region, the Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition (GLGMC), a group including U.S. and Canadian state and provincial geological surveys, is producing detailed 3D geologic maps that are helping to provide decision-relevant information to Great Lakes state communities. Due to similar regional geology, these state surveys can work together, sharing their expertise and resources so that each can better address geologic issues in their area. Working with the communities, the GLGMC provides and makes maps that solve problems such as groundwater contamination and resource development.

Our speakers are:

This webinar is co-sponsored by the American Association of State Geologists, Association of Engineering and Environmental Geologists, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society, Geological Society of AmericaNational Association of State Boards of GeologySociety for Sedimentary Geologyand the Society of Exploration Geophysicists’ International Exposition and 88th Annual Meeting in Anaheim.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about geologic mapping.

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition

Building the Modern World: Geoscience that Underlies our Economic Prosperity

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Geoscience information is integral to the strength and growth of communities and provides the resources for economic growth. All building materials, energy resources, construction projects, and hazard mitigation efforts are fundamentally based on geoscientific data and the geoscience workforce.

Our speakers are:

Key topics to be addressed include:

  • The industrial materials and minerals used to construct buildings/infrastructure
  • The importance of readily available construction materials and the resulting demand for mines and quarries throughout the U.S.
  • How geoscience is used to determine whether or not sites are suitable for infrastructure development
  • How geoscience is used to help guide design and construction to enhance the quality of life, economic strength, and physical security of coastal areas

Webinar Co-sponsors:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists; American Geophysical Union; Consortium for Ocean Leadership; Geological Society of America; National Ground Water Association; National Science Foundation; Soil Science Society of America

    Resources to Learn More

    Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about geoscience and the economy.

    Building the Modern World: Infrastructure is made of ROCKS

    How do pyrite and pyrrhotite damage building foundations?

    Pyrite and pyrrhotite are minerals known as iron sulfides. When iron sulfides are exposed to water and oxygen, a series of chemical reactions breaks down the iron sulfides and forms new minerals called sulfates. These sulfates take up more space than the original iron sulfides. As they grow, the new sulfate minerals push against the surrounding rock, causing it to swell and crack. This causes damage in two main ways:

    What is Lidar and what is it used for?

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    "LIDAR, which stands for Light Detection and Ranging, is a remote sensing method that uses light in the form of a pulsed laser to measure ranges (variable distances) to the Earth. These light pulses—combined with other data recorded by the airborne system— generate precise, three-dimensional information about the shape of the Earth and its surface characteristics.

    What is geoscience?

    Geoscience is the study of the Earth - its oceans, atmosphere, rivers and lakes, ice sheets and glaciers, soils, its complex surface, rocky interior, and metallic core. This includes many aspects of how living things, including humans, interact with the Earth. Geoscience has many tools and practices of its own but is intimately linked with the biological, chemical, and physical sciences.

    EarthCube Solicitation deadline: March 14

    EarthCube logo
    Do you have a passion for geoscience, data sharing, and cyberinfrastructure? Check out EarthCube! Initiated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2011, EarthCube aims to improve cyberinfrastructure and data sharing across the geosciences by funding interdisciplinary research. 2017 NSF EarthCube Solicitations are open until March 17, 2017. Learn more here.

    SEG podcast discusses mentoring in the geosciences

    SEG Logo
    Looking for something new and geoscience-y to listen to on your morning commute? Seismic Soundoff is an audio podcast produced by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). The ninth episode, "Mentoring geoscience leaders," features inverviews with Andréa Darrh, Dr. Esther Babcock, and Dr. John Bradford, who talk about the process and importance of mentoring in their careers.

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