groundwater

EARTH: Treated Water That's Too Pure Lets Arsenic Sneak In

In an effort to reduce water use in California, communities are turning to wastewater purification. This wastewater is being made so pure that it's actually causing problems: EARTH Magazine reports on a new study that showed that ultra-purified water allowed minute amounts of arsenic to leach from the surrounding bedrock into the water.

Making Produced Water More Productive

Friday, December 11, 2015

Overarching questions addressed in this webinar include:

  • What is produced water and how is it commonly disposed?
  • What environmental concerns does produced water pose?
  • What factors are influencing the demand for alternate applications of produced water?
  • What alternate uses for produced waters exist? What challenges do these alternatives face?

Our speakers include:

  • Kyle E. Murray, Ph.D., Oklahoma Geological Survey & University of Oklahoma | pdf download icon Slides YouTube download icon Video
  • Jeri Sullivan Graham, Los Alamos National Laboratory | pdf download icon Slides YouTube download icon Video
  • Holly Pearen, Environmental Defense Fund | Slides YouTube download icon Video

Webinar Co-Sponsors:
Association of American State Geologists, American Association of Petroleum Geologists

CEU Credits

To earn CEU credits, please complete the associated on-demand GOLI course that was developed from this webinar with a grade of 70% or higher and then submit your application for CEUs. CEUs are awarded from the American Institute of Professional Geologists. To view the full list of on-demand GOLI courses, please browse the GOLI course catalog.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about produced water.

Making Produced Waters More Productive: Perspectives on produced water and saltwater disposal

Water as One Resource: How interactions between groundwater and surface water impact water availability

Monday, July 13, 2015

Overarching questions addressed in this webinar include:

  • How do surface water and ground water interact and what implications do these interactions have for sustainable water management?
  • Are there new tools/resources/partnerships that can be used to better manage surface water and groundwater as connected resources?
  • What policy limitations exist for managing water as one resource?
  • Are there best practices that water management organizations can implement?

Our speakers include:

  • Ken Bradbury, Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey | pdf download iconSlides YouTube download icon Video
  • William M. Alley, National Ground Water Association | pdf download icon Slides YouTube download icon Video
  • Thomas Harter, University of California, Davis | Slides YouTube download icon Video

Webinar Co-Sponsors:
National Ground Water Association, Wisconsin Geological & Natural History Survey, Association of American State Geologists

CEU Credits

To earn CEU credits, please complete the associated on-demand GOLI course that was developed from this webinar with a grade of 70% or higher and then submit your application for CEUs. CEUs are awarded from the American Institute of Professional Geologists. To view the full list of on-demand GOLI courses, please browse the GOLI course catalog.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets on water resources.

Water As One Resource: How Groundwater Interacts with Lakes and Streams

Interactive map of water wells and springs in Kentucky

The Kentucky Geological Survey provide an interactive map of water wells and springs in Kentucky. Users can explore the map to find more detailed information for each feature, including the type of spring, well depth, primary well use, and links to well and spring reports. The map also includes outlines of sinkholes in Kentucky.

Click here to access the Kentucky Geological Survey's interactive map.

Source: Kentucky Geological Survey

 

Interactive map of groundwater levels in Maryland

The Maryland Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, maintains a state-wide network of groundwater observation wells. The data from these wells is used to create an interactive map of groundwater levels in Maryland. The map provides both historical and recent groundwater reading levels across a range of aquifers in the state of Maryland. 

Click here to use the interactive map.

Source: Maryland Geological Survey

Interactive map of water wells in Illinois

The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) is the official repository for the records of existing wells that have been drilled in the state of Illinois. With records for over 700,000 wells, the interactive water wells map allows users to explore a range of information including the location, depth, and bedrock topography for all recorded wells in Illinois. Data for water and related wells exists for private water wells, engineering borings, and stratigraphic borings.

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