groundwater

NGWA: Peter G. McCornick to Give Keynote at Dec. Meeting.

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The National Groundwater Association has announced that Peter G. McCornick, PhD, PE, D. WRE will give the keynote at NGWA’s Groundwater Week and the Irrigation Association’s 2016 Irrigation Show and Education Conference and is titled, Water for Food Security: Solutions for the Context. “Food and water security are two major interrelated challenges facing the world.

Desalination as a Source of Fresh Water

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Background: Fresh water is an increasingly scarce resource in an increasingly populous and water-intensive world. Maintaining an adequate supply of fresh water both nationally and globally will be one of the largest challenges of the 21st century. Desalination of salty water – from both the ocean and the ground – represents a huge potential source of fresh water. The development of this resource requires a combination of geoscience, engineering, waste management, policy, and community outreach and participation.

Our speakers are:

  • Tzahi Cath, Ph.D., Ben L. Fryrear Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video
  • Jessica H Jones, Director of Communications, Poseidon Water | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video
  • Katherine R. Zodrow, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Environmental Engineering, Montana Tech of the University of Montana; Non-Resident Scholar, Center for Energy Studies, James A. Baker III Institute, Rice University | pdf download icon Slides   YouTube download icon Video

Webinar Co-Sponsors: National Ground Water AssociationAssociation of Environmental & Engineering Geologists, International Association of Hydrogeologists: United States National Chapter

Downloads:
pdf download icon Webinar flyer

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about desalination.

Desalination as a Source of Fresh Water: Desalination 101

What is groundwater used for?

Roughly 60 percent of global groundwater use is for irrigation; most of the rest is used in households and industry.1 Groundwater uses vary significantly by country, and partly depend on climate. In some countries with abundant rainfall, such as Indonesia and Thailand, irrigation needs are very low, so household water supply is the main use for groundwater.

Which areas in the United States are most dependent on groundwater?

Groundwater use is highest in parts of the country with limited rainfall but high water needs, especially for irrigation purposes. Most of these areas are in the western half of the country, where annual rainfall is typically much lower than in the East and where surface water supplies cannot meet the demand for water.

In 2010, groundwater provided 25% of the total freshwater used in the United States. However, nine states depended on groundwater for at least 50% of their freshwater supply:1

Interactive map of water wells in Nebraska

The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources provides an interactive map of water wells in the state. Wells are color-coded by use, and include geothermal, injection, irrigation, domestic, monitoring, and commerical wells, plus many other types. Users can click on each well to access registration and ownership information.

Additional map layers include transportation, aerial photography, and lakes and rivers.

Click here to access the Nebraska DNR's map of water wells.

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