RFG 2018 Conference

mapping

Geologic Atlas User's Guide: Using Geologic Maps and Databases for Resource Management and Planning, updated 2014

A geologic atlas is intended to describe the geologic framework of our home and how the subsurface environment provides the resources we need. It describes the materials and features that begin just beneath the soil and it continues down to the bedrock surface and beyond. This User’s Guide is intended for people that don’t have training in geology or hydrology- most people. Every Minnesotan uses water, and every Minnesotan has an effect on water, so we all have a role and a stake in how that resource is distributed, how it is used, and how we affect its quality and availability. The purpose of the Guide is to explain in simple terms where our water comes from, how geology and climate control its distribution, and how we can manage water to maximize the availability of high quality water for ourselves and the habitat we live in. The atlases can provide very practical information such as what aquifers are available to a homeowner that needs to drill a well. The atlases also work at larger scales answering questions such as “where is the largest or most productive aquifer in this county”, or conversely, “where is the best place in this county to isolate potential contaminants from our water system?”. The atlases document existing hydrologic conditions, such as water levels in aquifers, so that we can recognize and respond to changes in those levels if necessary.

Geologic Atlas User's Guide: Using Geologic Maps and Databases for Resource Management and Planning

A geologic atlas is intended to describe the geologic framework of our home and how the subsurface environment provides the resources we need. It describes the materials and features that begin just beneath the soil and it continues down to the bedrock surface and beyond. This User’s Guide is intended for people that don’t have training in geology or hydrology- most people. Every Minnesotan uses water, and every Minnesotan has an effect on water, so we all have a role and a stake in how that resource is distributed, how it is used, and how we affect its quality and availability. The purpose of the Guide is to explain in simple terms where our water comes from, how geology and climate control its distribution, and how we can manage water to maximize the availability of high quality water for ourselves and the habitat we live in. The atlases can provide very practical information such as what aquifers are available to a homeowner that needs to drill a well. The atlases also work at larger scales answering questions such as “where is the largest or most productive aquifer in this county”, or conversely, “where is the best place in this county to isolate potential contaminants from our water system?”. The atlases document existing hydrologic conditions, such as water levels in aquifers, so that we can recognize and respond to changes in those levels if necessary.

The Geoscience Community Honors the Man Who shook Up Earthquake Science

he American Geosciences Institute is honoring one of the scientists who advanced earthquake hazards preparedness and mitigation in the U.S. by his superlative service to the earth sciences. This year’s recipient of the Ian Campbell Medal, Dr. James “Jim” Davis, is one of the key scientists behind U.S. earthquake hazards and loss reduction policy as it is known today.

#TBT - September 1983 Geotimes

September 1983 cover of Geotimes

The September 1983 issue of Geotimes (now EARTH Magazine) featured a cover with an image celebrating when the Smithsonian Institution put its collection of fossils from the Burgess Shale on display for the first time at the National Museum of Natural History. The caption reads as follows: "This year for the first time, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History has put on display specimens from its unequaled collection of fossils from the Burgess Shale (British Columbia). At the entrance to Dinosaur Hall, a diorama, shown in part of the cover of this issue, recreates the muddy bottom where those creatures lived at the base of an algal reef. A clutch of arthropods (Canadaspis perfecta) crawls up the slope on the right where mud has slumped from the terrace, the fatal weakness that will bury—and preserve—an entire population of Middle Cambrian shallow marine fauna. Sponges cling to the reef face. (photo by Chip Clark, the Smithsonian Institution)"

The Value of Geologic Mapping

This position statement (1) summarizes the consensus views of GSA regarding the importance of geological mapping for natural-resource and land-use decision making; (2) encourages partnerships among government, academia, and industry to share mapping expertise and technology; (3) promotes the development of digital data and maps in a readily accessible and useable form; and (4) encourages educational institutions to value and reward the teaching of geologic mapping skills.

EARTH: Mapping Field Camp's Past and Present: Exploring a Mainstay of Geoscience Education

EARTH Magazine explores the ritual of field camp as geoscientists' rite of passage for thousands of U.S. college students. Geology field camps date back to the days of great explorers and naturalists like John Muir and his contemporaries. Now young men and women gear up and pack out to geologically unique locations nationwide. Traditional skill sets are now taught alongside relevant technology to keep students workforce-ready.

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