mining

Which mineral commodities used in the United States need to be imported?

For many mineral commodities, the United States uses more than it produces. The balance between imports, exports, and use depends on many factors. These factors include resource availability, global economic markets, social and technological changes, production costs, resource demands, and trade agreements.1 Some minerals are more abundant or more cheaply produced in other countries. As a result, there are some mineral commodities that the U.S. does not produce domestically, making the country completely dependent on imports for these commodities.

Interactive map of mineral resources in New York State

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's Mineral Resources Navigator provides an interactive map of mines, oil and gas wells, and other regulated wells in New York State.

The map is updated nightly, and can be used to find locations and permitting and operating dates for thousands of mines and wells across the state.

Click here to access the NYSDEC Mineral Resources Navigator.

Underpinning Innovation: The Science and Supply of America's Critical Minerals and Materials

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Background: Critical minerals and materials are key components of the innovation economy. Minerals are a part of almost every product we use on a daily basis, either as the raw materials for manufacturing processes or as the end products themselves. Advanced technologies for communications, clean energy, medical devices, and national security rely on raw materials from mines throughout the world. In 2010, China curtailed exports of rare earth metals and sparked major concern about the security of global supply chains for a range of vital minerals and materials.

Speakers highlight:

  • Research on locating and processing the minerals and materials that fuel cutting-edge technology and manufacturing across the United States
  • The role of information on the global supply of, demand for, and flow of minerals and materials in identifying critical minerals and supporting economic and strategic decision making.

Our speakers are:

Webinar Co-Sponsors:

American Chemical Society, American Exploration & Mining Association, American Physical Society, Critical Materials Institute, Geological Society of America, Industrial Minerals Association -North America, Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Society of Economic Geologists, U.S. Geological Survey

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about critical minerals.

Underpinning Innovation: Critical Minerals in the Context of Global Mineral Resources

Interactive map of coal mines in Iowa

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources's (DNR) interactive map of coal mines in Iowa shows the locations of coal mines and mine entrances throughout Iowa, and also has the option to search the map by street address. Users may click on the map to access information about mine use dates, type, mining method, entrance type, and links to original mine maps.

Click here to use the Iowa DNR's interactive map of coal mines in Iowa

Source: Iowa Department of Natural Resources

EARTH: Studies Re-examine How Major Copper Deposits Form

Humans depend on copper for everything from electrical wiring to water pipes. To meet demand, the metal has been largely mined from Porphyry Copper Deposits (PCDs). For decades, scientists generally agreed upon the geological processes behind PCD formation; now EARTH Magazine examines two new studies that suggest alternatives to these long-held understandings.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - mining