nsf

Geoscience COVID-19 Study Enters Second Phase, Examines Pandemic's Lasting Impact

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to announce that its Geoscience COVID-19 study has been extended into a second phase that will continue the longitudinal study through March 2022, thanks to continued support by the National Science Foundation (Award #2029570).

Gordon E. Brown Jr.

Dr. Gordon E. Brown Jr. is the D.W. Kirby Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences at Stanford University and Professor Emeritus of Photon Science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The recipient of AGI's Ian Campbell Medal for Superlative Service to the Geosciences, Dr. Brown has served the geosciences in a variety of professional capacities including multiple leadership roles at Stanford University as well as significant advisory committee work for the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, Los Alamos National Lab, Argonne National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, the National Research Council, the Gemological Institute of America, the Carnegie Institution for Science, and various geoscience societies including the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, the Geochemical Society, and the Mineralogical Society of America. Dr. Brown earned his Ph.D. in Mineralogy and Crystallography from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University in 1970.

AGI Affiliation: 

Member at Large

Congress reauthorizes national earthquake hazards program

Cracked road from earthquake

A bill to reauthorize the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) through fiscal year 2023 passed the House on November 27 and now awaits final approval by the President. The National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act of 2018 (S. 1768) serves as a follow-up to the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977, which established NEHRP as the nation’s interagency platform for seismic hazards.

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy hosts a State-Federal STEM Education Summit

Writing hands

On June 25 and 26, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) hosted the 2018 State-Federal STEM Education Summit, bringing together education and science leaders from eighteen federal agencies along with more than two STEM leaders. Throughout the summit, stakeholder groups provided input for development of the upcoming Federal STEM Education Strategic Plan, which is required by the America COMPETES Act of 2010 (PL 11-358) to be updated every five years.

Research community responds to NSF divestment of marine seismic research vessel

IES Oceans Glyph

On April 10, the National Science Foundation (NSF) released a Dear Colleague Letter, titled “Towards a New Approach for the Provision of Marine Seismic Capabilities to the U.S. Research Community,” announcing its decision to divest of the marine seismic research vessel Marcus G. Langseth by 2020. Early career geophysicists and groups such as the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) have replied to NSF with letters expressing concern about divestment of the vessel and limited options to continue cutting edge seismic research in deep-ocean crustal imaging.

House Appropriations Committee approves NSF, NOAA, NASA, NIST, and OSTP funding

U.S. Money

On May 17, the House Appropriations Committee approved the chamber’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies appropriations bill (H.R. 5952). The bill would provide $8.2 billion for NSF, which is $407.5 million more than the FY 2018 enacted amount; $5.2 billion for NOAA, a $750 million reduction from last year; $21.6 billion for NASA, an increase of $840 million; and $985 million for NIST, a decrease of $214 million.

House Science Committee advances NASA Reauthorization and STEM education and research bills

Earth

The House Science Committee held a full committee markup of two bills, the Innovations in Mentoring, Training, and Apprenticeships Act (H.R.5509) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Authorization Act of 2018 (H.R.5503). H.R.5509 directs NSF to provide grants for research about STEM education approaches and the STEM-related workforce. The NASA Authorization Act would reauthorize the agency for FY 2018 through FY 2019, and was intensely debated during the markup due to disagreements about language slashing the FY 2019 authorized funds for Earth Science.

House science committee delves into NSF budget request for FY 2019

Writing hands

The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to review the fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request and funding priorities for the National Science Foundation (NSF). Although the Administration initially proposed a $2.2 billion cut to NSF’s budget compared to FY 2017, an addendum released with the budget request provided flat funding for the agency at approximately $7.47 billion. While the FY 2019 budget request would sustain the same FY 2017 funding level for the agency overall, it proposes a different distribution of funds for programs within NSF.

Congress passes FY 2018 omnibus with record funding of geoscience agencies

U.S. Money

Congress passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill on March 23 that will fund the federal government through September 2018. The 2,232-page bill, entitled the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018, rejects the Administration’s proposed deep cuts to federal science agencies. Instead, many science agencies received increased funding, in part due to the increased budget authority for FY 2018 non-defense discretionary spending agreed to last month in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018.

For more information on the federal budget process, including a more detailed programmatic funding analysis for geoscience-related agencies, please visit AGI’s Overview of Fiscal Year 2018 Appropriations.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - nsf