RFG 2018 Conference

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Slow-moving slides may be triggered by cold temperatures

Slow-moving landslides, while not as dramatic as their faster-moving counterparts, can damage infrastructure and cause headaches for the communities they affect. Slow-moving slides are generally associated with rainfall or snowmelt, but a new study in Japan has shown that some of these slides may occur when a certain kind of clay is exposed to cold temperatures. In the January issue of EARTH Magazine, the link between ground temperature and slow slides is explored, including implications for the science of predicting similar landslides around the world.

Life-saving Diplomacy: The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program at Thirty

On Nov. 13, 1985, the eruption of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia killed more than 23,000 people. Geoscientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Wash., moved to action. Having studied the warning signs and responded to the eruption of Mount St. Helens five years earlier, they knew from experience that the Nevado del Ruiz disaster could have been prevented. Their advocacy paved the way for the formation of the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) in 1986. VDAP is the world’s first and only international volcano response team. In the January issue of EARTH Magazine, VDAP’s growth and evolution over 30 years are chronicled, highlighting the team’s past successes and goals for the future.

'Citywide Celebrations' Give Earth Science Week a Local Focus

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to announce city-specific celebrations of its annual geoscience awareness campaign, Earth Science Week, which took place October 9-15, 2016. Major American cities such as Houston, Denver, Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia, served as major centers of public awareness activities.

AGI Awards Diversity Grants to Geoscientists Studying Deep Carbon

The American Geosciences Institute is pleased to announce the latest award recipients of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) Diversity Grants. This was the final round of awards for the current two-year project supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. During the course of this project, AGI supported a total of 14 traditionally underrepresented geoscientists to participate in DCO-related research, events, and field experiences. A review of the project and its findings was presented at the 2016 Geological Society of America Annual Meeting.

EARTH: Humans, Megafauna Coexisted in Patagonia before Extinction

As we celebrate National Fossil Day, EARTH Magazine brings you a story set in Pleistocene South America, and was home to large megafauna species like giant sloths and saber-toothed cats. At some point as the climate warmed and human settlers began hunting, the megafauna living in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego went extinct.

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