press release

The Origins of Plate Tectonics

Plate tectonics has been a centerpiece of earth science for decades, but Earth didn't always have tectonic plates. As the planet coalesced from cosmic dust approximately 4.6 billion years ago, it had a single, unbroken lithosphere. So how and when did the plates break apart and begin their seemingly never-ending round of musical chairs?

EARTH Interviews NHC Director During Hurricane Awareness Week

On May 9, EARTH News Editor Timothy Oleson went to check out the National Hurricane Awareness Tour's stop in Washington, D.C., at Ronald Reagan National Airport, where he sat down with National Hurricane Center (NHC) director Rick Knabb to learn more about the tour and efforts to track and forecast tropical storms.

Tallying Temperature Drops Inside Tornadoes

Collecting weather data can be hazardous, but with wind speeds exceeding 200 miles per hour, flying debris, and steep gradients in both air pressure and temperature, the inside of a tornado might just be the ultimate extreme. As EARTH Magazine examines in its May issue, a team of research engineers led by Georgios Vatistas at Concordia University in Montreal is exploring this harsh environment from a safe distance by using computer models to estimate temperature changes inside tornadoes.

Prominent Pesticides Escape Into the Environment

A silent spring and a summer without honey? Current events have renewed interest in science that informs us about the health of our environment. In EARTH Magazine's May cover story, read about efforts to track where and how certain pesticides are making their way offsite, staying in the environment for longer than previously thought, and potentially endangering beneficial species like honey bees and aquatic invertebrates.

New Research Suggests Earthquake Risk Models Should Account for Syrian Refugees

As the Syrian Civil War enters its sixth year, seismic hazard might not immediately come to mind, but there is a reason it should. According to research presented at the AGU Fall Meeting, new estimates of the number of earthquake fatalities that could be expected in Turkey under several potential earthquake scenarios are 3 to 20 percent higher when Syrian refugees are counted in seismic risk models. In the April issue of EARTH Magazine, read how researchers at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville made this discovery, which will provide vital data for disaster mitigation and response efforts.

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