RFG 2018 Conference

usgs

USGS EDMAP Program - Training the Next Generation of Geoscientists

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

EDMAP is an interactive and meaningful matching-funds grant program with universities for students to gain experience and knowledge in geologic mapping as well as contribute to the national effort to geologically map all of the United States. This program trains the next generation of geologic mappers and is one of the three components of the congressionally-mandated U.S. Geological Survey National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP). Geology faculty, skilled in geologic mapping, request EDMAP funding to support upper-level undergraduate and graduate students at their institution in a one-year mentored geologic mapping project that focuses on a specific geographic area. Also, each EDMAP proposal must be closely coordinated with a State Geologist or a USGS geologic mapping project. Every federal dollar awarded is matched with university funds. EDMAP has supported 144 universities and over 850 students from geoscience departments across the Nation. Following the presentations, you can listen to the open discussion period in which audience members from around the world to ask questions of the speakers.

Our speakers include:

  • Randall C. Orndorff pdf download icon Download presentation slides
    Director, Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center at the U.S. Geological Survey
    previously: Associate Program Coordinator, National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, U.S. Geological Survey
     
  • Dr. John T. Haynes pdf download icon Download presentation slides
    Assistant Professor, Department of Geology & Environmental Science, James Madison University
     
  • Alan F. Halfen pdf download icon Download presentation slides
    Ph.D. Student, Department of Geography, University of Kansas

Webinar Co-sponsors: U.S. Geological Survey

Resources to Learn More:

USGS EDMAP Program - Training the Next Generation of Geoscientists

EARTH: Earthquake? Blame it on the Rain

The U.S. Geological Survey's website states it in no uncertain terms: There is no such thing as "earthquake weather." Yet, from at least the time of Aristotle, some people have professed links between atmospheric conditions and seismic shaking. For the most part, these hypotheses have not held up under scientific scrutiny and earthquake researchers have set them aside as intriguing but unfounded ideas. However, in the last decade new efforts to identify effects of weather-related, or in some cases climate-related, processes on seismicity have drawn new interest.

AGI Publishes Living with Unstable Ground

Many ongoing natural processes and human activities can displace the ground under our homes and communities at considerable economic cost and human suffering. The best solutions to these unstable ground problems are based on awareness of where and how they occur. Living with Unstable Ground, written by Dr. Thomas L. Holzer of the U.S. Geological Survey, explains how soil types, slope movements, catastrophic collapses, and regional ground movement affect communities and how to mitigate these disruptive, dangerous, and costly problems.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - usgs