RFG 2018 Conference

water quality

Interactive map of groundwater monitoring information in the United States

The National Ground-Water Monitoring Network compiles information from over 7,000 groundwater monitoring wells across the country, including Federal, State, and local groundwater monitoring networks. Although the image above only shows the contiguous United States, the interactive map also includes wells from Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Two-year delay to WOTUS applicability date finalized after the Supreme Court ruled that challenges belong in federal district courts

U.S. Supreme Court building

On January 22, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that any challenges to the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) Rule must be filed in federal district courts, not federal courts of appeals. While the Supreme Court’s ruling would have permitted enforcement of the WOTUS Rule in 37 states, the EPA and USACE finalized a rule on January 31 that creates a new applicability date for the WOTUS rule two years from now.

Techniques for Developing High Resolution LNAPL Conceptual Site Models

This course is intended for geologists involved in Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) assessment and remediation. Roger Lamb, the course presenter, provides information on the development of high resolution conceptual site models that can be used to guarantee the project goals are met. The class will cover advantages of a high resolution LNAPL Conceptual Site Model (LCSM); design and implementation of a high resolution investigation field program; case studies and end uses of a high resolution LCSM.

Desalination as a Source of Fresh Water

Fresh water is an increasingly scarce resource in an increasingly populous and water-intensive world. Maintaining an adequate supply of fresh water both nationally and globally will be one of the largest challenges of the 21st century. Desalination of salty water – from both the ocean and the ground – represents a huge potential source of fresh water. The development of this resource requires a combination of geoscience, engineering, waste management, policy, and community outreach and participation.

Converting Membrane Interface Probe Sensor Results into VOC NAPL Distribution Information

This course will focus on how to use Membrane Interface Probe sensor results in combination with soil and groundwater analytical results to map the distribution of volatile organic chemical non aqueous phase liquids. Roger Lamb, covers guidelines for using direct sensing tools such as the MIHPT system, best practices for collecting and analyzing soil and groundwater samples, and gives examples from case studies on how to combine direct sensing data with analytical results to estimate NAPL distribution.

Equus Beds Groundwater Management District No. 2 Sustainability Assessment

The objective of this study was to assess the prospects for sustainability of the portions of the High Plains aquifer (HPA) in the Equus Beds Groundwater Management District No. 2 (GMD2) in south-central Kansas. For the purposes of this report, sustainability is defined as being achieved when spatially averaged water levels are stable with time, i.e. the average annual water-level change over an area is zero for a period of several years. Given the temporal variability in annual precipitation and groundwater use, there will be year-to-year rises and falls in spatially averaged water levels across GMD2. However, those changes will average out to zero over a period of several years if the aquifer is being pumped at a sustainable level. The specific purpose of this study was to determine the average annual water use that would produce stable areally averaged water levels over a given area.

High Plains Aquifer Index Well Program: 2016 Annual Report

This report provides a description of conditions as of late winter 2017. The report consists of (a) an update of the hydrographs for all of the index wells and for the expansion wells in the vicinity of the Scott and Thomas index wells (one well near the Scott index well and three wells in the vicinity of the Thomas index well); (b) an interpretation of the hydrographs from all of the index wells; (c) a discussion of the installation of the new index well in GMD4; (d) an update and interpretation of the hydrographs of the expansion wells in the vicinity of the Haskell index well; and (e) a discussion of climatic indices and radar precipitation data and their relationship to annual water-level changes at six of the wells and to water use in the vicinity of those wells.

Interactive map of hazardous waste cleanups in the United States

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides an interactive map of hazardous waste cleanups across the United States. The "Cleanups in My Community" map provides a huge amount of information on thousands of cleanups of many kinds. For every cleanup, users can access and download reports, assessments, compliance actions, and the EPA's assessment of the potential for any contaminated land to be used for renewable energy development.

Interactive map of spills in South Dakota

The South Dakota Department of Environment & Natural Resources provides an interactive map of reported spills in the state (yellow triangles in picture above). Spills are reported for hazardous or environmentally harmful materials such as oil, gasoline, pesticides, solvents, acids, and other industrial chemicals. Spill information is provided from the early 1970s to the present and include information on the source, material, location, and date of the spill.

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Examples from the Great Lakes

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Less than one-third of the U.S. is mapped at the level of detail necessary to make informed planning decisions on a local scale concerning natural resources, natural hazards, infrastructure planning, and environmental stewardship. In the Great Lakes region, the Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition (GLGMC), a group including U.S. and Canadian state and provincial geological surveys, is producing detailed 3D geologic maps that are helping to provide decision-relevant information to Great Lakes state communities. Due to similar regional geology, these state surveys can work together, sharing their expertise and resources so that each can better address geologic issues in their area. Working with the communities, the GLGMC provides and makes maps that solve problems such as groundwater contamination and resource development.

Our speakers are:

This webinar is co-sponsored by the American Association of State Geologists, Association of Engineering and Environmental Geologists, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society, Geological Society of AmericaNational Association of State Boards of GeologySociety for Sedimentary Geologyand the Society of Exploration Geophysicists’ International Exposition and 88th Annual Meeting in Anaheim.

Resources to learn more:

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition

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