water availability

House lawmakers introduce natural resource sustainability bills

Nuclear power plant, Czech Republic

Throughout January, several bills were introduced in the House relating to natural resource sustainability. Representatives Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX-30) and Frank Lucas (R-OK-3) cosponsored the Energy and Water Research Integration Act of 2019 (H.R. 34), which directs the Department of Energy to consider the critical link between energy and water use in its programs. Representative Scott Tipton (R-CO-3) later introduced two energy-related bills, the Planning for American Energy Act (H.R. 785) and the Education and Energy Act (H.R. 786), to support responsible energy development and additional funding for education.

President Trump approves National Integrated Drought Information System Reauthorization Act

Atlean Lake in British Columbia

On January 7, President Trump signed a bill (S. 2200) into law that reauthorizes the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) through fiscal year 2023. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s NIDIS program provides drought information to farmers, ranchers, and other industries affected by extreme weather.

Well Re-Development in New England

This course is designed to provide water utility personnel, engineers, hydrogeologists, regulatory officials, and other interested persons an understanding about the sand and gravel and bedrock aquifers in New England, how and why well performance declines over time, and information about available options for rehabilitating these wells.

Managing Groundwater Storage

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Background:
Groundwater is a critically important source of water in the U.S., supplying fresh water for drinking supplies, agricultural irrigation, and streams, rivers, and ecosystems. However, groundwater is becoming increasingly depleted in most aquifers around the country, with impacts including shrinking aquifer storage capacities, land subsidence (and associated impacts like higher flood risk), and declining freshwater resources for communities and ecosystems. To mitigate and reverse the depletion of groundwater storage in local aquifers, many communities are turning to managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). MAR and ASR practices vary depending on local geology, groundwater and recharge water composition, local land use practices, and water use requirements. Implementing MAR and ASR requires careful planning to both maximize groundwater replenishment and protect groundwater supplies from contamination.

Our speakers are:

Thank you to our media partners, the American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Professional Geologists, American Meteorological SocietyAssociation of State Wetland Managers, Environmental and Engineering Geophysical SocietyGeological Society of America, the Geo-Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, National Association of State Boards of Geology, National Ground Water Association, and the Soil Science Society of America.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about groundwater.

Managed Aquifer Recharge in California

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