The Development of Geoscience-related Ethics Codes

PDF versionPDF version
Thursday, March 8, 2018 1:00 PM EST | 1 hour
Series: AGI/AIPG Geoscience Online Learning Webinar
CEUs: 0.10

Many geological and related engineering professional associations were founded in the 19th and early 20th centuries but ethics codes were generally not adopted until after WWII. The AAPG Code of Ethics was the first code and was adopted in 1924. Codes have changed over the years for a variety of reasons as has their organization. There are common principles in the codes like honesty, integrity, transparency, etc. Most codes also explicitly state that protection of the public’s health, safety, and welfare supersedes employer/client confidentiality. Emerging additions to ethics codes include statements about harassment and discrimination, sustainable development, and global human welfare. Whether an ethics code requires enforcement procedures, the implications of enforcing an ethics code, and the characteristics of effective disciplinary procedures are reviewed.

Webinar Fees:
  • AIPG CPG Member: $65.00
  • AIPG Member: $75.00
  • Non-Member: $90.00
  • Student: $20.00
  • College Class (up to 20 students): $100
  • Professional Group Rate (up to 10 registrants): $375

Presenter

Mr. Abbott’s first paper on professional geoscience ethics was published in 1989. Since then, he has presented many papers and talks on the subject. Beginning in November 1995, Mr. Abbott began compiling a column, “Professional Ethics & Practices,” for the AIPG’s magazine, The Professional Geologist, and the column has appeared in each issue since. Mr. Abbott serves as the Chairman of AIPG’s Ethics Committee, which is responsible for inquiring into allegations of ethical misconduct by AIPG members and, when appropriate, prosecuting cases charging violations of AIPG’s Code of Ethics. Mr. Abbott is also a member of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy’s Ethics Committee.

Mr. Abbott holds an AB in Earth Science from Dartmouth College and an MS in geology from the Colorado School of Mines. He spent 21 years as a geologist for the US Securities and Exchange Commission in Denver assisting natural resources entities to comply with the SEC’s disclosure requirements and investigating and assisting in the prosecution of mining and oil and gas frauds. Since 1996 he has been an independent consultant specializing in natural resource disclosure issues, resource and reserve classifications and their application to specific deposits, and professional geoscience ethics. He is a Certified Professional Geologist by AIPG, is a Chartered Geologist by the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy and the Geological Society of London, holds the European Geologist title, and is licensed.

CEU Credits

All registrants who attend the entire duration of this webinar will receive 0.1 CEUs from the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

College Course Participation: A faculty member can register on behalf of a course and/or group of their students to participate in the webinar. With this registration, the faculty member can submit up to 20 participating students for awarding of 0.1 CEUs to each of them by AIPG.