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Super Typhoon Angela satellite imagery from 1995
Classroom Activities
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS)

Water moves from the ground to the atmosphere and then returns to the ground, however, the actual path water takes in its cycle is more complicated. There are many stops on water's journey. Students will learn how the water cycle works using 3-D paper craft activity.

Cloud to ground lightning in a storm chase, 1980
Classroom Activities
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS)

At its basic, water moves from the earth's surface to the atmosphere and then returns to the surface. However, the actual path water may take in its cycle is far more complicated. The students will discover more of these cycles by acting as water molecules and travel through parts of the overall...

Channel Islands, California
Classroom Activities
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS)

Water is the most abundant and important substance on Earth. It is essential to life and is a major component of all living things. There are approximately 336,000,000,000,000,000,000 gallons of water on Earth, existing in three states: solid, liquid, and gas. The sources for this water storage...

Cloud to ground and cloud to cloud lightning
Classroom Activities
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS)

What does up, must come down. Precipitation is the most commonly seen aspect of the hydrologic cycle. Students will learn how the water cycle works using 3-D paper craft activity. The students will see a demonstration of the concept of precipitation.

Emerald Spring, Yellowstone National Park
Classroom Activities
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS)

There are three states of matter: gas, liquid, and solid. Water in our atmosphere exists in these three states constantly. As the temperature of water vapor (a gas) decreases, it will reach the point at which it turns into a liquid (called the dew point or the point at which dew forms). This...

About the Education Resources Network

The Education Resources Network aggregates geoscience education resources from a variety of providers. The goal is to provide visitors with the widest possible collection of curricula, classroom activities, teacher professional development opportunities, science education standards, virtual field trips, teaching ancillaries and much more.

We are continually adding new content, so please check back frequently.

We encourage you to review our collections, suggest other resources, and let us know when items are out of date or problematic for other reasons.