Burning Grass Releases More Nitrogen Pollution Than Burning Wood

Burning Grass Releases More Nitrogen Pollution Than Burning Wood
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
2/9/2017
 
Where there's smoke, there's fire - but what's in the smoke? A recent air quality study from the University of Colorado Boulder has confirmed earlier laboratory experiments that show that grass and crop fire smoke carries greater amounts of nitrogen-containing volatile organic compounds (NVOCs) than wood fire smoke. Different NVOCs emit unique wavelength "signatures," so when scientists examine smoke plumes using a high-resolution mass spectrometer, they can pinpoint which NVOCs are present. With the spectrometer in tow, study author Matthew Coggon and his team drove in and around Boulder and Aspen, Colo., surveying various smoke plumes and learning more about what's in the smoke. In the February issue of EARTH Magazine, learn how these scientists are using NVOCs to identify different types of smoke and to track fires around the planet. Read the full story in EARTH Magazine: https://www.earthmagazine.org/article/burning-grass-releases-more-nitrog....
 
The February issue of EARTH Magazine is now available online. Read about how marine scientists have embedded robotic sensors in mussel beds to measure climate change impacts. Or read about the findings of a new study in Nature that is challenging our understanding of how canyons are formed. For these stories and more, subscribe to EARTH Magazine.
 
###
 
Keep up to date with the latest happenings in Earth, energy and environment news with EARTH Magazine online at www.earthmagazine.org. Published by the American Geosciences Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.
 
###
 
The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.
 

Press Release PDF: