Press Releases

Alexandria, VA - The American Geosciences Institute is pleased to recognize Dr. Susan Werner Kieffer, Professor Emerita at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, with the 2017 Marcus Milling Legendary Geoscientist Medal. The Medal will be awarded to Dr. Kieffer at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists awards ceremony on April 2, 2017, in Houston.
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 15:00
The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) has signed a new consensus document, Geoscience Policy Recommendations for the New Administration and the 115th Congress. The document outlines strategies for achieving shared national interests in which geoscience plays a key role, offering recommendations around five high-level thematic areas.
Monday, March 20, 2017 - 17:00
The Arctic looks pretty inactive during the winter, but more may be happening than meets the eye. According to a recent study, some carbon dioxide and methane are released during the early spring thaw, suggesting that critical processes are taking place during the Arctic winter. Read the full story in EARTH Magazine.
Monday, March 20, 2017 - 10:00
The American Geosciences Institute congratulates Master's student Clarice Perryman and Ph.D. student Zena Cardman as the 2017 recipients of the Harriet Evelyn Wallace Scholarship. The scholarship, which is awarded to women pursuing graduate degrees in geoscience, disburses a $5,000 award for one academic year. Wallace Scholars who are continuing their graduate studies are eligible to apply for the award a second time.
Friday, March 3, 2017 - 14:00
Are seismic hazard maps getting a fair shake? Earthquake risk is notoriously difficult to forecast, but the maps are improving, and seismologists are learning key lessons from meteorology and an even more unlikely source: baseball. In the March issue of EARTH Magazine, a group of experts provides candid insight into the dual challenge of designing seismic hazard maps and testing their effectiveness.
Wednesday, March 1, 2017 - 14:30
The American Geosciences Institute announces its flagship publication, EARTH Magazine, is now available direct from Amazon.com on the Kindle. Now, the latest EARTH issue can be delivered to your Kindle each month automatically, providing yet another way to access EARTH’s timely news and niche content. Visit http://a.co/5yVCeAW to sign up for a free trial from Amazon.
Monday, February 27, 2017 - 14:30
What would happen if an ocean current were pushed off course - and why might that occur? The Agulhas Current, which flows southwest along the eastern coast of Africa, presents an opportunity to test these questions. Although the conventional understanding suggests that currents would intensify along their existing paths, a recent study in Nature suggests that stronger surface winds are causing the Agulhas' path to broaden and meander, and to become more chaotic. Read the full story in EARTH Magzine.
Friday, February 24, 2017 - 14:30
Some of the world's richest fossil locales are in Mongolia: For instance, you can find dinosaur fossils every few steps in the country's Flaming Cliffs. But many Mongolians have no idea their country has such a treasure trove of dinosaurs because the specimens are often removed and displayed in other countries. However, one Mongolian paleontologist is working to change this paradigm by introducing children to dinosaur science and rebuilding Mongolia's fossil collection. Read the full story in EARTH Magazine.
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 03:30
Alexandria, VA - M.J. Tykoski, an eighth grade teacher at Cooper Junior High School in Wylie, Texas, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award for Excellence in K-8 Earth Science Teaching. Tykoski earned her Master's degree in Educational Leadership from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Texas Earth Science Teachers Association, and is the recipient of numerous grants and awards. She was a finalist for last year’s award.
Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 09:30
A series of "atmospheric river" storms have brought thirst-quenching rain to much of California, but much of that water is contributing to high - and in some cases dangerous, as seen with the Oroville Dam - levels of runoff. In the April comment for EARTH Magazine, Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California Water Policy Center, provides timely insight into what he calls "a blessing and a challenge for California water managers." Read more in EARTH Magazine's April comment, live today at EARTH online.
Monday, February 13, 2017 - 15:18

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