careers

AGI Workforce Program: Career Resources for All Geoscientists

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

With rising college tuition and uncertainty of the return of investment in higher education, it has become increasingly important to prepare students with marketable skills for the workforce and arm them with the tools to secure employment. Online education and Professional Science Master’s programs often try to address the deficiencies graduates face when seeking employment, but these strategies aren’t always widely accepted within traditional academic programs.

Measuring the match of graduating skills portfolio to the demand by geoscience employers

Saturday, October 1, 2011

With the economic malaise in the United States, colleges and universities are assessing the impact of academic programs related to their overall mission and constituency. Geoscience departments are facing pressure to demonstrate the return on investment of their educational program provides. The metrics of these inquiries are variable, but usually center on the employment of graduates; often from partial data gathered by alumni offices. Many departments do not have structured longitudinal tracking of their graduates, thus limiting the extent of their supporting information.

Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Collaborative and social technologies have been increasingly used to facilitate distributed data collection and observation in science.  However, “Web 2.0” and basic social media are seeing limited coordinated use in building student and early-career geoscientists knowledge and understanding of the profession and career for which they have undertaken.  The current generation of geology students and early career professionals are used to ready access to myriad of information and interaction opportunities, but they remain largely unaware about the geoscience profession, what the full scope of

Attitudes, Jobs, and the Future: Parallels for Geography and Geology

Thursday, April 17, 2008

The geosciences and geographic disciplines are seeing a convergence in talents and skills in many parts of the respective disciplines.  The geosciences, like most technical professions, are facing a critical talent gap into the future, with too few new students entering the profession and too many opportunities for that supply.   This situation has evolved as a result of multiple forces, including increased commodity prices, greater strain on water resources, development encroachment on hazardous terrain, and the attrition of Baby Boomers from the workforce.  Demand is not the only issue, a

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