RFG 2018 Conference

2018

House oversight hearing looks at DOI burdens to onshore energy production

Drilling rig

On January 18, the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held an oversight hearing to assess the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) progress on eliminating burdens to domestic onshore energy production. During the hearing, witnesses commented on the regulatory uncertainties, inefficiencies, and inconsistencies that may disproportionately impact small businesses. BLM’s Deputy Director for Programs and Policy Brian Steed affirmed that recent actions to reduce regulatory burdens have created more revenue for the agency.

Interior Department announces plans for U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program

The Noble John Sandifer jackup rig

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced his plans for the development of the National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program (National OCS Program) for 2019-2024. The new Draft Proposed Program (DPP) aims to make more than 98 percent of the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the OCS available for leasing and exploration. Less than a week after release of the DPP, Secretary Zinke informally announced that all of Florida’s coastline would be removed from consideration in the proposed five-year leasing program, prompting questions from various lawmakers and other stakeholders about the apparent preferential treatment given to the state.

FERC rejects Department of Energy proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear plants

Nuclear power plant, Czech Republic

On January 8, the Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) rejected a proposal that was submitted by Secretary of Energy Rick Perry in September 2017 to subsidize the operating costs of coal and nuclear power plants, since the rule did not satisfy certain statutory standards. However, FERC also recognized that this issue warrants further attention and initiated a new proceeding to specifically evaluate the resilience of the bulk power system in certain operating regions.

Directors of NSF and NIST testify regarding progress on implementing the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act

Technology background

On January 30, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a hearing to discuss the implementation of the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (AICA). The AICA reauthorized and updated policies at the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and other federal science agencies.

NSF report on the state of U.S. science shows America in the lead as China rapidly advances

NSF Logo

According to the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Science and Engineering Indicators 2018 report released on January 18, the U.S. is currently the global leader in science and technology (S&T), though our nation’s share of global S&T activities is declining as others continue to rise. This year’s report indicates that the U.S. invests the most in research and development (R&D), attracts the highest venture capital, awards the most advanced degrees, and is the largest producer in high-technology manufacturing sectors. However, U.S. leadership in the global science and engineering landscape is being challenged by rapidly developing nations, particularly China.

Second session of 115th Congress begins with new members and shifting committee assignments

U.S. Capitol

After the second session of the 115th Congress began on January 3, two new members were sworn into the Senate – Doug Jones (D-AL) and Tina Smith (D-MN) – bringing the party numbers to 51 Republicans, 47 Democrats, and 2 Independents. There is now a one-vote margin separating the majority and minority for each committee in the Senate, except the Judiciary Committee which has a two-vote margin. House committee assignments have also shifted in the second session, with the Energy and Commerce Committee welcoming four incoming Republican members and new leadership announced in the Science, Space, and Technology Committee.

Three-day government shutdown ends with fourth continuing appropriations bill for 2018

U.S. Capitol with flag

The federal government went into a three-day partial shutdown after the Senate rejected a short-term spending agreement that passed in the House to keep agencies funded past January 19. The shutdown ended when both chambers passed and President Donald Trump signed H.R.195 into law on the night of January 22. H.R.195 funds the government at FY 2017 levels through February 8, extends funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program for six years through FY 2023, and delays the enactment of three health care related taxes.

Open Invitation: Attend Earth Science Week Celebration in Old Town, Alexandria

ESW logo

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to welcome educators, students, and the general public to explore connections between the geosciences and the arts during The Late Shift: STEAM-Powered December. The event, which will kick off the Earth Science Week 2018 theme of "Earth as Inspiration," will include hands-on activities, demonstrations linking art and geoscience, and opportunities to craft "take home" artworks based in Earth science. In addition, educational materials such as Earth Science Week Toolkits will be available for free for teachers, students, homeschoolers, and others to take away.

Earth Science Week 2018 Theme Announced: 'Earth as Inspiration'

ESW logo

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is pleased to announce that the theme of Earth Science Week 2018 will be "Earth as Inspiration." The coming year's event will be October 14-20, 2018, andemphasize artistic expression as a unique, powerful opportunity for geoscience education and understanding in the 21st century.

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