geology

Peer Review of Models Predicting the Fate and Export of PCBs in the Lower Fox River Below DePere Dam

Friday, April 14, 2000

This report represents the results of the AGI peer review panel charged with examining the current state of modeling of the fate and transport of PCBs in the lower Fox River in Wisconsin. AGI created the peer review panel at the request of de maximis, inc., St. Charles, IL, and support for the peer review process was provided by the Fox River Group through de maximis, inc. The panelists were selected by AGI and the panel chair, Dr. John Tracy. Two meetings of the panel were held. The first meeting on December 10, 1999 was held in Neenah, WI. During that meeting, LTI, the U.S.

House approves reauthorization of National Geologic Mapping Act

Geological Surveys Database

The House of Representatives passed the National Geologic Mapping Act Reauthorization Act (H.R. 4033) on November 13, sending the bill to the Senate where it currently awaits further action. The act, introduced by Representative Doug Lamborn (R-CO-5), reauthorizes the National Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP) through fiscal year 2023 and provides for the Associate Director for Core Science Systems to replace the Associate Director for Geology as the chairperson of the geologic mapping advisory committee.

SEPM Announces New 2017 Research Conferences

Check out the 2017 SEPM Conference Schedule
The Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) has posted three new research conferences slated for 2017. The North American Micropaleontology Section (NAMS) is proud to announce that it will once again sponsor a Geologic Problem Solving with Microfossils Conference April 5-9, 2017. The Microfossils conference series is a unique meeting concept because of its broad focus on the use of microfossils for solving geological problems. Session themes are intended to span chronostratigraphy, paleoclimate, paleoceanography, environmental quality assessment, evolution and new technologies, among others.
 

EARTH: On the Trail of Hannibal's Army - and Elephants - in the Alps

During the Second Punic War, Hannibal, in a brazen move, led a massive army over the Alps, surprising the Romans from the supposedly impenetrable northern border. The exact route Hannibal took is unknown, although some geographic information can be gleaned from historical accounts such as those of the Roman writer Polybius. Armed with this information, and the knowledge that tens of thousands of men, horses and elephants must have left some trace, geoscientists are hunting down possible locations using deduction and chemistry to test hypotheses.

2016 AAPG-ACE, Check it Out!

2016 AAPG-ACE Website. We love the design!
Have you been following #ACE2016? This week AAPG had its Annual Convention and Exposition, and SEPM is hosting their annual meeting there concurrently. You can see what happened by searching the hashtag #ACE2016 on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. AGI's current President, and Texas State Geologist, Scott Tinker, was recognized for his outstanding leadership (we couldn't agree more!).  There are also pictures of the networking reception co-hosted by AWG and SEG, in addition to AAPG. As always, we love to see the pictures from the Imperial Barrel Award (IBA) competition and the field trips exploring the geology of the Calgary area. 

EARTH: Urban Geology - An Emerging Discipline in an Increasingly Urbanized World

More than half of the total human population on Earth lives in urban areas, where, like rural areas, geology affects us every day. Yet when we think about "geology," most of us think of the hinterlands. That needs to change, argue the authors of a new feature in EARTH Magazine discussing what the role of urban geology is, what it can be and the potential role geoscience organizations can play in curating the geologic data revealed during construction, excavations and surveys.

EARTH Magazine: Kamikaze Typhoons Spared Japan from Kublai Kahn

In a small lake along the Japanese coast, scientists have found evidence of turbulent waters centuries ago. These telltale signs of severe weather in the geologic record support the legend of the two kamikaze typhoons that protected Japan from Mongol invasion. EARTH Magazine follows University of Amherst geoscientist Kinuyo Kanamaru and his research team as the dig up history in search of signs of the storms.

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