critical issues

Improving Earthquake Resiliency Through the Use of Post-Earthquake Clearinghouses

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Since 2000, there have been 51 significant earthquakes that have caused over $3.4 billion dollars in damages and 31 deaths in the United States.1 While large earthquakes pose a substantial threat along the West Coast and in Alaska, they also can affect the Central and Eastern United States, as they did during the 1811 and 1812 New Madrid earthquakes and 1886 Charleston, SC earthquake. Earthquakes can have wide ranging impacts, such as the 5.8 magnitude earthquake in Mineral, VA that happened in 2011 and was felt across multiple states along the East Coast, causing $200-$300 million in damages and this year’s 7.1 magnitude earthquake near Ridgecrest, CA that was felt in Nevada and Arizona, and cased $100 million in damages.1,2,3 A single event can be devastating: for example, the 1994 Northridge, CA, 6.7 magnitude earthquake caused at least $40 billion in direct damage and killed around sixty people.3

As population continues to expand into risk-prone areas, improved risk management practices are increasingly necessary to improve emergency preparedness and response by providing information on earthquake processes, assessing the adequacy of built infrastructure and building codes, and providing insight on how to improve future recovery and urban development efforts. Post-earthquake technical clearinghouses are a successful strategy for tracking the collection of information about ground failures, structural damage, and other impacts from major earthquakes, reducing duplication of effort in data collection, and disseminating information about events to emergency response managers. In this webinar, our speakers discuss earthquake risk in the U.S., the importance of coordinated post-earthquake response, and the effectiveness of post-earthquake technical clearinghouses in improving earthquake resiliency.

Our speakers are:

References

1 M5.8 August 23, 2011 Mineral, Virginia, U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program. https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/events/2011virginia/
2 M 7.1 - 2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence, U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program. https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/ci38457511/executive
3 National Geophysical Data Center / World Data Service (NGDC/WDS): Significant Earthquake Database. National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA. doi: 10.7289/V5TD9V7K

CEU Credits

If you would like to earn 0.1 CEUs through the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG) for attending this webinar, please use the following link to submit your application for CEUs: Apply for CEUs

Please note that you must attend at least 70% of the live webinar in order to be awarded the CEUs from the American Institute of Professional Geologists, and that your attendance time will be checked prior to the CEUs being issued.

College Course Participation: A faculty member can register on behalf of a course and/or group of their students to participate in the webinar. With this registration, the faculty member can submit up to 20 participating students for awarding of 0.1 CEUs to each of them by AIPG.

Media Partners

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