RFG 2018 Conference

workforce

Professionalism and Geoethics: Creating a Workplace Environment Where Everyone Can Succeed

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Presenter

David W. Mogk is a Professor of Geology at Montana State University. He is a metamorphic petrologist by training, with research interests in the genesis and evolution of Precambrian continental crust, mid-crustal petrogenetic processes, and spectroscopic analysis of mineral surfaces. He has worked for 25 years to promote excellence in STEM education having served as program officer in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education, and has contributed to the development of STEM education digital libraries, curriculum development and faculty professional development programs, NRC panels on Promising Practices in Undergraduate STEM Education and Discipline-Based Education Research, and recently has developed a curriculum and web resources on Teaching Geoethics Across the Geoscience Curriculum. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of America and the Mineralogical Society of America, is recipient of the Mineralogical Society of America Distinguished Public Service Medal and the American Geophysical Union Excellence in Geophysical Education Award. He currently serves on the American Geophysical Union Ethics Task Force. He received his PhD from the University of Washington (Seattle) in 1984.

CEU Credits

All registrants who attend the entire duration of this webinar will receive 0.1 CEUs from the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

College Course Participation: A faculty member can register on behalf of a course and/or group of their students to participate in the webinar. With this registration, the faculty member can submit up to 20 participating students for awarding of 0.1 CEUs to each of them by AIPG.

The Development of Geoscience-related Ethics Codes

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Presenter

Mr. Abbott’s first paper on professional geoscience ethics was published in 1989. Since then, he has presented many papers and talks on the subject. Beginning in November 1995, Mr. Abbott began compiling a column, “Professional Ethics & Practices,” for the AIPG’s magazine, The Professional Geologist, and the column has appeared in each issue since. Mr. Abbott serves as the Chairman of AIPG’s Ethics Committee, which is responsible for inquiring into allegations of ethical misconduct by AIPG members and, when appropriate, prosecuting cases charging violations of AIPG’s Code of Ethics. Mr. Abbott is also a member of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy’s Ethics Committee.

Mr. Abbott holds an AB in Earth Science from Dartmouth College and an MS in geology from the Colorado School of Mines. He spent 21 years as a geologist for the US Securities and Exchange Commission in Denver assisting natural resources entities to comply with the SEC’s disclosure requirements and investigating and assisting in the prosecution of mining and oil and gas frauds. Since 1996 he has been an independent consultant specializing in natural resource disclosure issues, resource and reserve classifications and their application to specific deposits, and professional geoscience ethics. He is a Certified Professional Geologist by AIPG, is a Chartered Geologist by the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy and the Geological Society of London, holds the European Geologist title, and is licensed.

CEU Credits

All registrants who attend the entire duration of this webinar will receive 0.1 CEUs from the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

College Course Participation: A faculty member can register on behalf of a course and/or group of their students to participate in the webinar. With this registration, the faculty member can submit up to 20 participating students for awarding of 0.1 CEUs to each of them by AIPG.

U.S. Female Geoscience Enrollments and Degrees Experience - Marked Change in 2016

Currents #: 

124
Thursday, December 28, 2017

The participation rate of women in geoscience degree programs saw marked changes in 2016.  There was a spate of doctoral degrees awarded to women in 2016, which has also been reflected in a decline in the participation rate of graduate enrollment of women. We observe that often December graduates and prior summer graduates are counted as “degrees awarded,” but not as “enrolled.”  The percent of women receiving bachelor and master’s degrees remained steady, but undergraduate enrollment rates increased sharply to near historic highs at 44%.  

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