webinar

The Current and Mid-21st Century Geoscience Workforce

Friday, May 11, 2018

This webinar will look at the latest data from various AGI surveys on workforce, which will shed light on the current state of geoscience programs, student experiences, and a view of long-term trends.  In addition, several emerging trends regarding what the future of geoscience work will look like will be discussed, especially the impact of technologies such as machine learning and what that means for the future of geoscience employment.

PDF of Slides

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The Current and Mid-21st Century Geoscience Workforce

Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials

Friday, January 26, 2018

No country in the world produces all of the mineral resources necessary for modern society. International trade plays a critical role in providing these raw materials, forming a global network of production, export, import, and use. This network must continuously adapt to national and international developments in science, technology, politics, and economics. As a result, information on the global flow of raw materials plays a fundamental role in improving national and international resilience to potential supply disruptions and market changes.

Our speakers are:

This webinar is co-sponsored by the American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Australian Institute of GeoscientistsEuropean Federation of GeologistsGeological Society of AfricaGeological Society of LondonGeoscience Information Society, Mineralogical Society of America, and Society of Economic Geologists, with media partnership from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about critical minerals.

The Global Supply of Critical Materials: Assessing and Tracking Critical Mineral Commodities

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Examples from the Great Lakes

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Less than one-third of the U.S. is mapped at the level of detail necessary to make informed planning decisions on a local scale concerning natural resources, natural hazards, infrastructure planning, and environmental stewardship. In the Great Lakes region, the Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition (GLGMC), a group including U.S. and Canadian state and provincial geological surveys, is producing detailed 3D geologic maps that are helping to provide decision-relevant information to Great Lakes state communities. Due to similar regional geology, these state surveys can work together, sharing their expertise and resources so that each can better address geologic issues in their area. Working with the communities, the GLGMC provides and makes maps that solve problems such as groundwater contamination and resource development.

Our speakers are:

This webinar is co-sponsored by the American Association of State Geologists, Association of Engineering and Environmental Geologists, American Institute of Professional Geologists, Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society, Geological Society of AmericaNational Association of State Boards of GeologySociety for Sedimentary Geologyand the Society of Exploration Geophysicists’ International Exposition and 88th Annual Meeting in Anaheim.

Resources to learn more:

Search the Geological Surveys Database for reports and factsheets about geologic mapping.

Geologic Mapping to Empower Communities: Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition

2016 Critical Issues Forum: Addressing Changes in Regional Groundwater Resources: Lessons from the High Plains Aquifer

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Groundwater is often a "transboundary" resource, shared by many groups of people across town, county, state, and international boundaries. Changes in groundwater resources can create unique challenges requiring high levels of cooperation and innovation amongst stakeholder groups, from individuals to state and federal government.

The High Plains Aquifer (HPA), which spans eight states from South Dakota to Texas, is overlain by about 20 percent of the nation’s irrigated agricultural land, and provides about 30 percent of the groundwater used for irrigation in the country according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Work by the Kansas Geological Survey indicates that some parts of the aquifer are already effectively exhausted for agricultural purposes; some parts are estimated to have a lifespan of less than 25 years; and other areas remain generally unaffected (Buchanan et al., 2015).

The 2016 Critical Issues Forum was a 1-½ day meeting covering multiple aspects of groundwater depletion in the High Plains. Presentations covered the current state of the High Plains Aquifer and water usage from scientific, legal, regulatory, economic, and social perspectives. State-specific perspectives were provided from Kansas, Nebraska, Texas, and Oklahoma, and a variety of issues were discussed surrounding communication, negotiation, policy, and the influence of climate change. Break-out sessions and participant discussions identified lessons learned and best practices from the High Plains Aquifer experience that might apply to other regions facing changes in the Earth system.

The Forum was hosted by the Payne Institute for Earth Resources at the Colorado School of Mines, and sponsored by the Geological Society of America, the National Ground Water Association, the American Institute of Professional Geologists, the National Association of State Boards of Geology, and the Association of American State Geologists.

For more information about the Forum, including the final report, please visit the 2016 Critical Issues Forum home page.

2016 Forum: Selected Footage

New Live Webinar to Focus on Geoscience Applications to Environmental Remediation

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An upcoming webinar will tackle an important application of environmental geoscience: monitoring harmful chemicals that contaminate soil and groundwater. This webinar, scheduled for Wednesday, September 20, is presented as part of the growing Geoscience Online Learning Initiative (GOLI), a collaborative program between the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) and the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG).

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