News and Announcements

This free webcast, narrated by AGI Outreach Associate Brendan Soles, provides an overview of the photography, visual arts, essay, and video contests.
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 - 14:51
The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is now accepting advance orders for the Earth Science Week 2016 Toolkit. The Toolkit contains educational materials for all ages that correspond to this year's event theme, "Our Shared Geoheritage."
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 11:24
The soil deposits, topographical relief and climate present a well-known hazard to Stillaguamish, Wash., region, but the devastating Oso landslide made determining how many others had occurred in the past in the valley imperative.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 16:07
A 2002 eruption of Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that killed more than 100 people also triggered an earthquake eight months later that shook the town of Kalehe in the Lake Kivu region. EARTH Magazine explores just what happened to better understand a region that is being pulled apart by plate tectonics.
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 - 15:10
As the U.S. celebrates National Oceans Month in June, scientists who study the seafloor are excited because they believe that humans will end this century with a far better view of our seafloor than at any other time in human history. Geoscientists have been mapping land on Earth, and even other planets in our solar system, in high definition for years, but the picture of the ocean floor has remained blurry for the most part. But with advances in engineering, what lies beneath is starting to come into much better focus.
Friday, June 3, 2016 - 12:26
When people think of dangerous faults in America, the the San Andreas probably comes to mind first. But another potentially greater threat lurks in the East Bay region of Northern California, just a stone's throw from San Francisco and the tech hub of Silicon Valley: the Hayward Fault. In the June issue, EARTH Magazine guest author Steven Newton lays out just what is at risk, and what to expect when an earthquake strikes on what may be the most dangerous fault in America.
Monday, May 23, 2016 - 11:22
For many years, scientists have pondered if the Vikings' diaspora to Greenland was made easier by the warmer temperatures of the Medieval Warm Period. Climate data extracted from shells had indicated that this warm period extended to Greenland, but new research looking at glacial movements and using isotope data from terminal moraines suggests this may not necessarily be so.
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 14:04
For years, scientists have used mineral, sediment and ice layers, deposited intermittently throughout geologic time, to track the global climate record. These can come from caves, lakes, the oceans and ice sheets. But over the course of the last decade a new method has been developed that presents an opportunity for geoscientists to assess global climate history in almost any arid landscape.
Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 11:27
For more than 40 years, AGI's Data Sheets have been a critical tool for the geoscientist in the field, the lab, and the classroom. For decades its bright orange cover and three-ring binding were distinctive in the geoscience community. The book evolved into its current, full-color and spiral bound format with the 2005 debut of the fourth edition.
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 15:47
In celebration of Earth Science Week 2016, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) is sponsoring four contests honoring this year's theme, "Our Shared Geoheritage." This year's competitions will feature the traditional photography contest, visual arts contest, and essay contest -- as well as a new video contest.
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 13:03

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