Geoscience in Your State: Kentucky

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Cover of Geoscience Policy State Factsheet. Image credit: AGI

By the numbers: Kentucky

  • 3,159 geoscience employees (excludes self-employed)1
  • 207 million gallons/day: total groundwater withdrawal3
  • $592 million: value of nonfuel mineral production in 20174
  • 74 total disaster declarations, including 29 severe storm, 22 flood, and 8 fire disasters (1953-2017)6
  • $314,000: NSF GEO grants awarded in 201714...

Agencies Working on Geoscience Issues in kentucky

Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection

The Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection's mission is to protect and enhance Kentucky's environment.  This mission has a direct impact on Kentucky's public health, citizens' safety, and the quality of Kentucky's natural resources.

Kentucky Department for Natural Resources

The Kentucky Department for Natural Resources, through its divisions and partnerships, provides technical assistance, education and funding to help landowners, institutions, industries, and communities in conserving and sustaining Kentucky's natural resources.  In addition, the department inspects timber harvests and mining operations to ensure the protection of citizens, the environment, and workers.

Kentucky Emergency Management

Kentucky Emergency Management (KYEM) is a division of the Kentucky Department of Military Affairs. Among other programs, KYEM co-ordinates dedicated programs related to earthquakes, hazardous materials, and superfund sites.

Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet

Kentucky's EEC oversees energy development and environmental protection in Kentucky. The EEC consists of three departments: the Department for Environmental Protection, the Department for Natural Resources and the Department for Energy Development and Independence.

Kentucky Geological Survey
The mission of the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) is to provide for citizens, researchers, industry, and government, scientifically based information on Kentucky's geology and mineral and water resources.
Kentucky Office of Energy Policy

The Office of Energy Policy was created through an Energy and Environment Cabinet Reorganization during the 2018 Kentucky General Assembly. The OEP retains many functions of the former Department for Energy Development and Independence. The mission of the OEP is to utilize Kentucky’s energy resources for the betterment of the Commonwealth while protecting and improving the environment.

Case Studies & Factsheets

Cover of AGI Factsheet 2018-002-Geologic Mapping and Public Health

Using Geologic Maps to Protect Public Health Geologic maps can be used to understand and mitigate public health risks across the US, in addition to their more traditional use in resource and infrastructure decisions. Geologic maps can show the location of naturally occurring hazardous materials and...

Cover of AGI Factsheet 2018-004 - Present Day Climate Change

Climate Science 101 Climate is the average of weather conditions over several decades.1,2 Geoscientists monitor modern climate conditions (1880 A.D. to present) in part by taking direct measurements of weather data (i.e., air temperature, rainfall and snowfall, wind speed, cloudiness, and so on)...

CI_Factsheet_2018_1_NewMadrid_180226_thumb.JPG

Earthquakes in the New Madrid Fault Zone The New Madrid fault zone (NMFZ) is a long-established weakness in the Earth’s crust in the central and eastern US where earthquakes have occurred for hundreds of millions of years. In 1811-1812, three large earthquakes (up to magnitude 7.5) caused severe...

Cover of Geoscience Policy State Factsheet. Image credit: AGI

By the numbers: Kentucky 3,159 geoscience employees (excludes self-employed)1 207 million gallons/day: total groundwater withdrawal3 $592 million: value of nonfuel mineral production in 20174 74 total disaster declarations, including 29 severe storm, 22 flood, and 8 fire disasters (1953-2017)6...

CI_Factsheet_2017_5_drywellprograms_170906_thumb.JPG

Introduction Dry wells improve stormwater drainage and aquifer recharge by providing a fast, direct route for rainwater to drain deep into underlying sediment and rock. Dry wells are most common in the western U.S. where clay or caliche layers slow down the natural drainage of water into underlying...