Geoscience in Your State: West Virginia

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Cover of Geoscience Policy State Factsheet. Image credit: AGI

By the numbers: West Virginia

  • 3,217 geoscience employees (excludes self-employed)1
  • 134 million gallons/day: total groundwater withdrawal3
  • $245 million: value of nonfuel mineral production in 20174
  • 67 total disaster declarations, including 29 flood, 23 severe storm, and 4 snow disasters (1953-2017)6
  • $294,000: NSF GEO grants awarded in 201714...

Agencies Working on Geoscience Issues in west virginia

West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) is a statewide operation, headquartered in Charleston. Operations are accomplished on a district or regional level, based upon the program, thus requiring a workforce throughout West Virginia. The WVDEP is involved in activites related to air quality, environmental quality and remediation, emergency response to hazards, land restoration, mining operations and reclamation, and regulation of the oil and gas industry.

West Virginia Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management

The mission of the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM) is to ensure the protection of life and property by providing coordination, guidance, support and assistance to local emergency managers and first responders. 

West Virginia Geological & Economic Survey

The WVGES was established with the purposes to, in general, (1) investigate the State's geological and physical resources, (2) make the results of these investigations promptly available to the public, and (3) provide topographic, geologic, and other maps of the State.

Case Studies & Factsheets

Cover of Geoscience Policy State Factsheet. Image credit: AGI
By the numbers: West Virginia 3,217 geoscience employees (excludes self-employed)1 134 million gallons/day: total groundwater withdrawal3 $245 million: value of nonfuel mineral production in 20174 67 total disaster declarations, including 29 flood, 23 severe storm, and 4 snow disasters (1953-...
Cover of Using Produced Water
Opportunities and Concerns in Using Produced Water Produced water is natural groundwater that is extracted along with oil and gas. It is commonly salty and mixed with oil residues,1 so it must be either disposed of or treated and reused. About 2.5 billion gallons of produced water are extracted...
Cover of Water Sources for Hydraulic Fracturing
Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Demand Hydraulically fracturing a modern well can require millions of gallons of water for the initial fracturing process. This is a potential problem in arid regions with competing demands for fresh water (i.e. high water stress), such as Colorado and West Texas (see...
Cover of Non-Fuel Products of Oil and Gas
Introduction Oil and natural gas are complex mixtures of chemicals. Oil refineries and gas processing plants extract the organic compounds that make the best fuels for transportation, heating, and electricity generation: gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, heating oil, and methane. Other chemicals...
Screenshot of the USEITI case studies showing the Boone, Logan and Mingo counties case study highlighted
The U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Information and Data Management has produced a series of case studies on extractive industries across the United States, focusing on coal, copper, gold, iron, natural gas, and oil.
Cover of What Determines the Location of a Well
Introduction Oil- and gas-rich rocks are only found in certain parts of the United States, so most of the country has no oil or gas wells. Where oil and gas production is commercially viable, many factors determine the exact location of each well, including leasing, permitting, competing land uses...
Cover of Groundwater Protection in Oil and Gas Production
Introduction The United States relies on groundwater for roughly 25% of its fresh water.1 This groundwater is found in porous, permeable rocks (aquifers) that often lie close to the Earth’s surface – the deepest freshwater aquifers are found more than 6,000 feet underground,2 but most are much...
Cover of AGI Factsheet 2018-004 - Present Day Climate Change
Climate Science 101 Climate is the average of weather conditions over several decades.1,2 Geoscientists monitor modern climate conditions (1880 A.D. to present) in part by taking direct measurements of weather data (i.e., air temperature, rainfall and snowfall, wind speed, cloudiness, and so on)...
CI_Factsheet_2017_5_drywellprograms_170906_thumb.JPG
Introduction Dry wells improve stormwater drainage and aquifer recharge by providing a fast, direct route for rainwater to drain deep into underlying sediment and rock. Dry wells are most common in the western U.S. where clay or caliche layers slow down the natural drainage of water into underlying...